Rep. St. Fleur joins Menino administration

By 
Gintautas Dumcius
Apr. 23, 2010

State Rep. Marie St. Fleur, who announced earlier this year she isn't running for re-election, will join Mayor Thomas Menino's cabinet, the mayor's office said Friday.

Her title will be chief of advocacy and strategic investment. She will coordinate education, job creation and other initiatives supported by local, state and federal programs and investments.

St. Fleur will be succeeding Michael Contompasis, who is stepping down as director of Menino's Intergovernmental Relations Office. But her duties will be more expansive than his were.

Starting in June, she will oversee the Intergovernmental Relations Offices and be involved in the city's efforts in aiding the earthquake-stricken nation of Haiti. Her annual salary will be $120,000.

Other offices and issues under her purview include the education initiative "Circle of Promise," the Small and Local Business Enterprise Office and the Office of New Bostonians.

St. Fleur, a Haitian-American, has served in the House since 1999.

“I get to continue to advance a lot of the issues that I have been so very concerned about,” including helping underperforming students, she told the Reporter on Friday. “I get an opportunity to not simply work on the policy but to also assist in the implementation.”

The move ends months of speculation of what her next role will be. Rumors swirled that she was taking a job in the Menino administration as far back as January.

But the move is also likely to set off fresh waves of speculation of what the future holds for her whenever Menino decides not to run for reelection. St. Fleur would become an early favorite to succeed him once that happens.

"Our efforts to turnaround our schools, create job opportunities, and invest in all Bostonians require unprecedented coordination,” Menino said in a statement. “Rep. St. Fleur will be an effective advocate from the White House to Beacon Hill to the streets of Boston and she will help make sure we maximize tools for our neighborhoods, and that those resources and reforms translate into results for our neighbors.”

Check back here for coming updates to this developing story.