Business

Walczak wing adds capacity, promise at Codman Center

Codman's latest addition: Sandra Cotterell, CEO of the Codman Square Health Center, left and Meg Campbell, executive director of the Codman Academy Charter Public School, outside the newly-opened William J. Walczak Education and Health Center on Epping Street. Codman's latest addition: Sandra Cotterell, CEO of the Codman Square Health Center, left and Meg Campbell, executive director of the Codman Academy Charter Public School, outside the newly-opened William J. Walczak Education and Health Center on Epping Street.

It’s a brand new four-story building with a strikingly familiar name.

The William J. Walczak Education and Health Center — named for the founder of the Codman Square Health Center— is open for business – and classes. An official grand opening is on hold pending the return to action of the only other living Bostonian who gets his name on big new buildings these days – Mayor Thomas Menino – but the building itself has been in partial use since September and is due to be fully up and running by year’s end.  Read more

Patrick cuts spending by $225 million, will seek power to cut local aid

By 
Michael Norton and Matt Murphy, State House News Service
Dec. 4, 2012

As part of a plan to address an estimated $540 million mid-year budget gap, Gov. Deval Patrick on Tuesday slashed spending by $225 million and asked the Legislature to allow him to unilaterally reduce unrestricted local aid to cities and towns by 1 percent.

Unrestricted local aid pays for local services, such as public safety budgets, and is delivered separately from state aid to fund local education spending, which is not targeted for cuts under Patrick’s plan.

“I don’t think this is draconian. Obviously every city and town worries about an impact on their local aid, but as I say this is relatively modest. We are spreading the pain as broadly as possible and sensible and we have a solution for closing that gap in unrestricted local aid if the Lottery continues to help,” Patrick said.

The spending cuts ordered by the governor will hit nursing homes, special education funding, school transportation for the homeless and reimbursement rates for hospitals that treat low-income patients.  Read more

Meeting to discuss planned BMW dealership on Morrissey Blvd.

Proposed Herb Chambers dealership on Morrissey Blvd.Proposed Herb Chambers dealership on Morrissey Blvd.The Boston Redevelopment Authority will convene a public meeting on Thurs., Dec. 6 to discuss auto magnate Herb Chambers' plan to convert the old Channel 56 building on Morrissey Boulevard into a car dealership and repair center.

The Reporter first reported in October that Chambers intends to purchase and renovate the now-empty TV studio at 75 Morrissey Blvd, which is valued at $4.5 million according to city records. The sale price of the property has not been disclosed and it is not yet clear if Chambers has acquired the property at this time.  Read more

Manufacturers facing dearth of younger skilled workers in next decade

By 
Colleen Quinn, State House News Service
Nov. 28, 2012

Manufacturing in Massachusetts faces a threat to its survival as older manufacturing workers retire without younger workers in line to replace them, according to a recent study.  Read more

Bowdoin-Geneva Main Streets leader fired by board

By 
Gintautas Dumcius, News Editor
Nov. 23, 2012

The Bowdoin-Geneva Main Streets organization is "in transition" following the abrupt departure of its executive director, Sandra Kennedy, who was terminated "for cause" by the group's board of directors last month. Weeks after Kennedy's dismissal, a representative of the Main Streets' board filed a police report alleging that a former employee had misappropriated funds from the group.

Kennedy, who had led the organization for six years, was fired on Oct. 17, according to the Department of Neighborhood Development, which works with the Main Streets groups.  Read more

Walczak heads to Shawmut construction firm

Bill Walczak, who co-founded the Codman Square Health Center and briefly served as head of Carney Hospital, is taking a job with Shawmut Design and Construction, the company said Wednesday.

A Savin Hill resident, Walczak left Carney in April, after 14 months as its president. He previously served for 36 years at the Codman Square Health Center.  Read more

Report: Housing market recovering, production boost needed

By 
Michael Norton, State House News Service
Nov. 14, 2012

Describing a housing market on the upswing in Massachusetts, researchers on Wednesday released a report calling for a surge in housing production and predicting that young workers saddled by college debt and again Baby Boomers looking to downsize will compete for smaller dwellings that better suit their needs.  Read more

Lower Mills mural to depict bygone village

Gregg Bernstein at work on the side of The Sweet Life restaurant. Photo by Bill Forry

Gregg Bernstein drew his inspiration for a new mural he’s painting this week in Lower Mills from an old postcard. Bernstein, the man behind many of Boston’s largest and most celebrated wall murals, has been commissioned to paint the scene by the owners of The Sweet Life, a restaurant and café that opened at the corner of Richmond Street and Dorchester Ave. in September.  Read more

End of an era as Argus-Citizen stops the presses

Calls began coming into the Reporter offices last week from readers and advertisers with word that another newspaper that services Dorchester— the Argus-Citizen— has published its last edition. Also closing, according to several sources: The South Boston Tribune, a weekly broadsheet like the Argus, that has been an influential newspaper in that community going back deep into the 20th century.

The Reporter has attempted to verify this information with the editor of the Argus-Citizen and its owner, Patrick Horgan, but we have been told simply by the editor that “a story is not necessary.” A number of sources who have spoken with the newspaper’s staff, however, have independently confirmed the news. (Update: Indeed, on Thurs., Oct. 25, the Tribune carried a page one brief titled "End of an Era" explaining the shut-down to readers. The same courtesy evidently was not afforded readers of the Argus-Citizen.)  Read more

Editorial: A welcome wave of development

If there are any lingering doubts that the local economy is poised for a strong bounce-back in the next few years, a quick review of the Reporter’s front pages over the last month is instructive. In particular, there is ample evidence that the Morrissey Boulevard corridor that links Savin Hill and Columbia Point is ready to blossom, with new buildings and renewal projects aimed at reinvigorating this well-situated northern nook of Dorchester.  Read more