Business

Davis dives in as new president at Carney Hospital

Andy DavisAndy DavisThe new president of Carney Hospital is a 41 year-old native Floridian who grew up in a two traffic light town and was the point guard for his high school and college basketball teams.

Andrew Davis has long since traded in his high top sneakers for wingtips. But he and his 6-foot-7 frame have been engaged in something of a full-court press in Dot and Mattapan since he took the helm at the Carney on May 7. Davis has been spotted at the First Parish Church banquet, the Mother’s Walk for Peace and in a Lower Mills village meeting with merchants.

And when he marched up the avenue alongside Carney’s float in Sunday’s Dot Day parade, he was seen pressing the flesh like a candidate for the US Senate.  Read more

City sends letter with suggestions for proposed sober housing in Lower Mills

By 
Gintautas Dumcius, News Editor
Jun. 1, 2012

The head of the city’s legal department this week sent a letter to the operators of a proposed sober housing business in Lower Mills, warning them that documents they provided to city officials cites one law that does not exist and another that does not apply in Boston.

William Sinnott, corporation counsel for the city, also noted in the letter that one of the buildings the operators are leasing is a former funeral home and may require a zoning change.  Read more

Gaming chief in Dorchester for June 7 business breakfast

Stephen Crosby, chair of the state Gaming Commission, is the guest speaker at Mt. Washington Bank's annual business breakfast on June 7. The breakfast is set for 7:30 a.m. at Venezia Waterfront Restaurant on Ericcson St. in Dorchester.

Crosby was the founding dean of the McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies at UMass Boston. The former political operative has worked for Democrats and Republicans, including Gov. Paul Cellucci and Acting Gov. Jane Swift. He also served on Gov. Deval Patrick's transition team.

Vietnamese soup has become signature dish in Dot

By 
Meena Ramakrishnan, Special to the Reporter
May. 31, 2012

A Dot Ave. stapleA Dot Ave. stapleThrow a stone from the Field’s Corner MBTA station, and you’re most likely to hit a Vietnamese restaurant serving some of the best Pho the city has to offer. Pho (pronounced fuh), a fragrant and flavorful noodle soup, is the Southeast Asian country’s most popular soup dish, and it has also found a fond place in Americans’ stomachs and hearts.

According to phofever.com, a website devoted to all things Pho, there are over 2,000 Pho restaurants across the U.S. and Canada. Dorchester certainly contributes to this figure, boasting at least eight in the neighborhood.  Read more

State/Bank loan helps Dot merchants open Hub eatery

Small Business: Treasurer Grossman and Rep. Forry toured the Slate Bar & Grill this week, highlighting a small business in the Financial District funded through a Dorchester bank and owned by neighborhood contractors.Small Business: Treasurer Grossman and Rep. Forry toured the Slate Bar & Grill this week, highlighting a small business in the Financial District funded through a Dorchester bank and owned by neighborhood contractors.State officials kicked off National Small Business Week on Monday morning by putting a spotlight on a former ice cream parlor in the Financial District that has been turned into a bar and grill by the same Dorchester contractors who established Ledge Kitchen & Drinks in Lower Mills.

State Treasurer Steven Grossman and state Rep. Linda Dorcena Forry toured the restaurant, called Slate, which received funds through a small business banking partnership that Grossman’s office is pushing.  Read more

Out of gas in Adams Corner

Soda Hut: Gallivan Blvd. gas station is one of two in Adams Village. Neither have gas for sale this week. Photo by Bill ForrySoda Hut: Gallivan Blvd. gas station is one of two in Adams Village. Neither have gas for sale this week. Photo by Bill ForryIt may be the busiest weekend at the pumps everywhere else, but all’s quiet at the two service stations in Adams Corner neighborhood right now. The village’s two gas vendors are out of commission— and have been for some time. And the issue has become a point of concern for neighbors and even officials at City Hall.

The old Soda Hunt fill-up station at the corner of Gallivan Boulevard and Granite Avenue has been closed for weeks now. The station’s pump handles are bagged in plastic, the cashier’s office is locked up tight, and the coolers that were once a handy spot to pick up tonic and ice are cleaned out. Eerily, the new-fangled outdoor TV monitors above each gas bay continue to pump out an endless stream of commercials and weather reports to the few motorists who continue to stop here in a vain search for gas.  Read more

‘Cash Mob’ swarm helps candy store find sweet spot

By 
Elizabeth Murray, Special to the Reporter
May. 24, 2012

A Sweet Place: The owners of the new Fields Corner store A Sweet Life won an online contest and a visit from ‘Cash Mob Dorchester’ on Monday. From left, Beverly Hilaire, Edwin Hilaire, and Mae Riggs, Beverly’s mom. 	Photo by Bill ForryA Sweet Place: The owners of the new Fields Corner store A Sweet Life won an online contest and a visit from ‘Cash Mob Dorchester’ on Monday. From left, Beverly Hilaire, Edwin Hilaire, and Mae Riggs, Beverly’s mom. Photo by Bill ForryThe Dorchester ‘Cash Mob’ struck again this week, as members of the group swarmed a new Fields Corner candy shop, ‘A Sweet Place’, in their ongoing attempt to bolster local businesses and the neighborhood economy.

The Dorchester Ave. store— located right next to the Fields Corner Branch Library— opened on April 16. Executive Director of Fields Corner Main Street Evelyn Darling said many people in Dorchester did not even know the business was there. This event helped “create a buzz”, she said.  Read more

Proposed take-out place loses license bid because of violence in and near its Grove Hall building

The Boston Licensing Board Thursday rejected a proposed takeout place after city officials said its owner has failed to do enough to curb violence in and near the Warren Street block of stores he owns.  Read more

Dot House celebrates new expanded services

By 
Staff
May. 7, 2012

Dot House celebration: Dorchester House CEO Joel Abrams addressed a crowd at the facility this morning. At right, (l-r) are Councillor Frank Baker, Senator Jack Hart, Mayor Tom Menino. Photo by Ed ForryDot House celebration: Dorchester House CEO Joel Abrams addressed a crowd at the facility this morning. At right, (l-r) are Councillor Frank Baker, Senator Jack Hart, Mayor Tom Menino. Photo by Ed Forry

Mayor Menino and CEO Joel Abrams are among those celebrating the official ribbon cutting for an $11.4 million expansion project at the Dorchester House this morning. The project doubled the size of both the Clinic Pharmacy and Lab and includes a beautiful new Physical Therapy clinic, renovated offices for the WIC program, additional conference rooms, and a larger more comfortable break room for staff.

Dorchester House was among the first health centers in the country to receive Federal Stimulus Funds in 2009 to expand the building in order to provide more access to health care. The Dot House can now accommodate over 26,000 additional patient visits annually. More in this week's Reporter.

Steward taps North Carolina man for Carney presidency

Andrew DavisAndrew DavisA health care executive from North Carolina has been hired to take over as president and CEO of the Carney Hospital next month. Andrew Davis was introduced to the Dorchester Avenue hospital’s board at a private meeting on Monday.

Accompanying Davis were Ralph de la Torre, the chairman and CEO of the Steward Health Care System, which owns Carney Hospital, and Josh Putter, Steward’s chief operating officer.  Read more