Civics

Dot Park’s protector is ready to pass the torch

Dot Park Leader: Jane Boyer holds a photograph of her late mother, Jane Callahan Mullaney taken in Dorchester Park in the 1940s. It was taken near the present site of the tennis courts, where Boyer has organized annual Easter Egg hunts for children. Photo by Bill ForryDot Park Leader: Jane Boyer holds a photograph of her late mother, Jane Callahan Mullaney taken in Dorchester Park in the 1940s. It was taken near the present site of the tennis courts, where Boyer has organized annual Easter Egg hunts for children. Photo by Bill Forry

Truly exceptional leaders know when it’s time to go. They know when it’s time to give someone else the opportunity to do the job— even if they would still do it better than anyone else could.

Jane Boyer, who intends to step down as president of the Dorchester Park Association this May, believes that her time as an organizer, advocate, and all-around watchdog for the 26-acre jewel in Lower Mills has run its course. She plans to announce her impending retirement at next Wednesday’s monthly meeting of the association — an all-volunteer outfit that has made immense improvements to the park under Boyer’s watch.  Read more

City’s bid to restore ‘Pit Bull’ ordinance isn’t fair, sensible

Charlie Ashmont: Author's longtime pet has been enforcement target in Boston before based on his pit bull-like appearance. Photo by Joyce LinehanCharlie Ashmont: Author's longtime pet has been enforcement target in Boston before based on his pit bull-like appearance. Photo by Joyce LinehanThe country looks to Massachusetts’ recently-passed animal control law as a model. Unfortunately, Councilor Consalvo and a few Boston officials, ignoring facts offered by animal experts, want to repeal portions of this new law that will improve public safety.

Legislation will soon be filed to once again allow ordinances based on dog breed. Boston’s 2004 Pit Bull Ordinance, nullified by a new state law, was at best ineffective and at worst harmful, avoiding meaningful attempts to address dangerous dogs in our communities.

My dog is probably a pit bull. That I say “probably” is indicative of a problem of identification in breed-specific legislation. I have a DNA test that says he is something else, but under the now-defunct Boston Pit Bull Ordinance, if a police or animal control officer thought perhaps he looked like one, he could have been seized from me, or I could be fined if I walked him without a muzzle. In addition, I paid much higher licensing fees than anyone with a dog not deemed pit bull and had my privacy invaded with a requirement that I file a photo of myself to obtain a dog license.  Read more

Former City Hall aide from Charlestown considering at-large run

A former City Hall aide is mulling a run for one of the City Council’s four at-large seats. “I am considering all of my options but I haven’t made any sort of concrete decision yet,” said Jack Kelly, who served as Mayor Thomas Menino’s neighborhood liaison in Charlestown.

Kelly said there is a need for more people at the state and city level talking about comprehensive substance abuse programs.

Kelly, who currently works at Massachusetts General Hospital as a community relations manager, is a member of the Charlestown Neighborhood Watch and the Charlestown Substance Abuse Coalition. He has also written for Patch.com and, according to his LinkedIn profile, served as an extra in the Ben Affleck movie, “The Town.”  Read more

First phase of Archdiocese reorganization does not affect Dorchester parishes

By 
Reporter Staff
Jan. 10, 2013

The latest phase of the Boston Archdiocese’s ongoing reorganization, announced on Thursday, did not include any Dorchester parishes. In a release, Cardinal Sean O’Malley said he formally accepted the plan, which over time will downsize 288 parishes into 135 “collaboratives.”

According to the Archdiocese, the affected parishes in the first phase, which will have 12 “collaboratives” and 28 parishes, include:

-- Saint Luke and Saint Joseph, Belmont
-- Saint Mary, Saint Margaret, Saint John, Beverly
-- Saint Mary, Saint Theresa, Saint Andrew, Billerica  Read more

The sixth term question

It's the Question that crops up at nearly every press conference as Mayor Thomas Menino eases back into his regular schedule: Is he running for a sixth term?

On Tuesday, after the mayor stood with shoe company executives who plan to move into Lovejoy Wharf in 2015, a reporter asked The Question. It prompted Menino spokeswoman, standing next to him, to quip "Bingo," perhaps for those playing along back at City Hall.  Read more

Let’s all get the Greenway back on track

One of the big unresolved news stories of the last year has been the Neponset Greenway and the state’s so-far unsuccessful efforts to get funding to extend the multi-use trail into Mattapan and to make enhancements along Dorchester Bay. Last year saw a second bid for federal grant money fall short— outcomes that were disappointing but also predictable, given the odds.  Read more

Dot leg of Red Line adorns cyclist’s leg

By 
Tayla Holman, Reporter Correspondent
Jan. 10, 2013

Adam Myerson: Professional cyclist and coach lives and loves Dot and the Red Line. Photo by Jon Safka/Cyclingphotos.caAdam Myerson: Professional cyclist and coach lives and loves Dot and the Red Line. Photo by Jon Safka/Cyclingphotos.ca“There are so many bad Boston tribute tattoos out there,” says Adam Myerson, a 40-year-old Fields Corner resident who has adorned a large part of his leg with colorful scenes from the Dorchester leg of the Red Line.

Myerson, a professional cyclist and fitness coach, is the president of Cycle-Smart, Inc. He decided to get the tattoo last year and turned to an old friend, the owner of Fat Ram’s Pumpkin Patch in Jamaica Plain. Ram helped Myerson flesh out the design of the tattoo— which was first brought to the wider public’s attention last year through the popular website universalhub.com.

Myerson already had a lot of tattoos, but wanted a Boston tribute tattoo that was “less universal” and more tied into his experience. He didn’t want to get a typical tribute such as a Red Sox or Bruins logo or the Boston skyline.

“And then I realized, I’m in love with the train,” said Myerson who grew up in Brockton, but spent much of his time in high school riding his skateboard in Boston and taking the BAT bus to Ashmont to ride the train.  Read more

Marr-lin swim team hosted Watertown

Marr-lin Swim Team hosts Watertown - The Marr-lin Swim Team hosted the Watertown Club for their final dual-meet of 2012. Marr-lin swimmers helped propel the team to win all five age groups.  Read more

A Tale of Two Neighborhoods: A response to the Boston Globe’s “68 Blocks” series

The following is one person’s response to a five-part Boston Globe series on the Bowdoin/Geneva neighborhood and to a subsequent editorial that appeared in the Reporter last week under the headline, “Globe’s ‘68 Blocks’ series was well worth the effort.” The author is a resident of the neighborhood.  Read more

Think about children everywhere when talking about mass violence

In the aftermath of the horror of the Newtown massacre and the nation’s reaction to it, one notices the contrast between the grief and resolve evident after this unspeakable crime and the apathy that prevails when “collateral damage” includes the unintended death of innocent children.

How many thousands of children have been killed by our forces in the wars of the last half century, from Vietnam to Afghanistan? That they were unintended consequences may assuage the conscience of those responsible, but it does not diminish the loss or ease the pain and sorrow of loved ones.  Read more