Civics

(UPDATED) Reports say Lynch to join race to replace Sen. Kerry, Lynch disagrees

Congressman Stephen Lynch is expected to make official next week what has been widely apparent: He's running in the Senate special election slated for later this year, though he told the Boston Herald Friday afternoon that he remains undecided.  Read more

(UPDATED) Tompkins appointed Suffolk County sheriff

Andrea Cabral’s chief of external relations will take over as Suffolk County sheriff, a source tells the Reporter. With Cabral signing on as Gov. Deval Patrick’s public safety secretary, Steven Tompkins will succeed her.

The State House News Service reported on Tuesday that Patrick will swear in Tompkins later today. A source with knowledge of the appointment confirmed the news to the Reporter.  Read more

On WBZ, Menino talks fundraising and another term inside City Hall

Mayor Thomas Menino says he still has an appetite for another four year term.

“No, my appetite is not less,” Menino told WBZ-TV’s Jon Keller in a sit-down at the city-owned Parkman House on Beacon Hill, where Menino is recuperating after lengthy hospital stays. “Just that I was – I can’t raise money from a hospital bed. I was in the hospital from October to January, so I wasn’t able to raise any money.”  Read more

Lt. Gov. Murray will not run for governor in 2014

By 
Matt Murphy, State House News Service
Jan. 18, 2013

Lt. Gov. Timothy Murray, after spending the last 15 years in local and statewide public office, will not run for governor in 2014, citing the time commitment that would be required to juggle his current job, a full-time campaign, and his responsibilities to his family.  Read more

(UPDATED) Yancey gets tourism committee as Jackson chairs new committee on technology

City Councillor Charles Yancey was given the chairmanship of a committee usually reserved for rookies and City Councillor Tito Jackson was tapped for a new committee focused on technology, according to committee assignments for 2013.  Read more

Steeple chase nears final hurdle at First Parish

Progress at First Parish Church restoration project: Workers built a scaffold shelter around the steeple earlier this month. Progress at First Parish Church restoration project: Workers built a scaffold shelter around the steeple earlier this month.

If all goes well, this will be the year that the exterior of First Parish Church is restored to its original 1896 glory. The crowning achievement of that huge effort will come when a crane swings the steeple of the grand white church back onto its lofty perch above Meetinghouse Hill.  Read more

Dot Park’s protector is ready to pass the torch

Dot Park Leader: Jane Boyer holds a photograph of her late mother, Jane Callahan Mullaney taken in Dorchester Park in the 1940s. It was taken near the present site of the tennis courts, where Boyer has organized annual Easter Egg hunts for children. Photo by Bill ForryDot Park Leader: Jane Boyer holds a photograph of her late mother, Jane Callahan Mullaney taken in Dorchester Park in the 1940s. It was taken near the present site of the tennis courts, where Boyer has organized annual Easter Egg hunts for children. Photo by Bill Forry

Truly exceptional leaders know when it’s time to go. They know when it’s time to give someone else the opportunity to do the job— even if they would still do it better than anyone else could.

Jane Boyer, who intends to step down as president of the Dorchester Park Association this May, believes that her time as an organizer, advocate, and all-around watchdog for the 26-acre jewel in Lower Mills has run its course. She plans to announce her impending retirement at next Wednesday’s monthly meeting of the association — an all-volunteer outfit that has made immense improvements to the park under Boyer’s watch.  Read more

City’s bid to restore ‘Pit Bull’ ordinance isn’t fair, sensible

Charlie Ashmont: Author's longtime pet has been enforcement target in Boston before based on his pit bull-like appearance. Photo by Joyce LinehanCharlie Ashmont: Author's longtime pet has been enforcement target in Boston before based on his pit bull-like appearance. Photo by Joyce LinehanThe country looks to Massachusetts’ recently-passed animal control law as a model. Unfortunately, Councilor Consalvo and a few Boston officials, ignoring facts offered by animal experts, want to repeal portions of this new law that will improve public safety.

Legislation will soon be filed to once again allow ordinances based on dog breed. Boston’s 2004 Pit Bull Ordinance, nullified by a new state law, was at best ineffective and at worst harmful, avoiding meaningful attempts to address dangerous dogs in our communities.

My dog is probably a pit bull. That I say “probably” is indicative of a problem of identification in breed-specific legislation. I have a DNA test that says he is something else, but under the now-defunct Boston Pit Bull Ordinance, if a police or animal control officer thought perhaps he looked like one, he could have been seized from me, or I could be fined if I walked him without a muzzle. In addition, I paid much higher licensing fees than anyone with a dog not deemed pit bull and had my privacy invaded with a requirement that I file a photo of myself to obtain a dog license.  Read more

Former City Hall aide from Charlestown considering at-large run

A former City Hall aide is mulling a run for one of the City Council’s four at-large seats. “I am considering all of my options but I haven’t made any sort of concrete decision yet,” said Jack Kelly, who served as Mayor Thomas Menino’s neighborhood liaison in Charlestown.

Kelly said there is a need for more people at the state and city level talking about comprehensive substance abuse programs.

Kelly, who currently works at Massachusetts General Hospital as a community relations manager, is a member of the Charlestown Neighborhood Watch and the Charlestown Substance Abuse Coalition. He has also written for Patch.com and, according to his LinkedIn profile, served as an extra in the Ben Affleck movie, “The Town.”  Read more

First phase of Archdiocese reorganization does not affect Dorchester parishes

By 
Reporter Staff
Jan. 10, 2013

The latest phase of the Boston Archdiocese’s ongoing reorganization, announced on Thursday, did not include any Dorchester parishes. In a release, Cardinal Sean O’Malley said he formally accepted the plan, which over time will downsize 288 parishes into 135 “collaboratives.”

According to the Archdiocese, the affected parishes in the first phase, which will have 12 “collaboratives” and 28 parishes, include:

-- Saint Luke and Saint Joseph, Belmont
-- Saint Mary, Saint Margaret, Saint John, Beverly
-- Saint Mary, Saint Theresa, Saint Andrew, Billerica  Read more