News

Dot's Hockey Man at The Heights

Jimmy Hayes circles around and around on the ice. The game slows down for him as he watches. Nick Petrecki slides the puck to Carl Sneep, and then, suddenly, Hayes has it. He spins around, and it's just him and the goal. The rink goes silent; this is his shot. He takes a big stroke, and the puck hits the goalpost. There is confusion, congestion in front of the goal; the sound begins to filter in again as Hayes wonders, Did it go in?  Read more

Huge bump seen in voter turnout. But will it last?

There were only two people standing on the traffic island in middle of Blue Hill Avenue with an Obama-Biden sign, but horns could be heard for several blocks around.

It was election day in Grove Hall.

Propping up the blue sign were the founder of the local radio station, TOUCH FM 106.1, Charles Clemons, and the executive director of the Grove Hall Neighborhood Development Corp., Sister Virginia Morrison. Each of them held the sign with one hand and waved at the traffic with the other. And whenever they waved, someone answered with a triumphant honk.  Read more

Altered plan is approved by the School Committee; some say potential savings 'not enough'

Altered plan is approved by the School Committee; some say potential savings 'not enough'

Wilkerson not stepping down immediately

By 
By
Nov. 12, 2008

State Sen. Dianne Wilkerson, who was photographed by the FBI allegedly stuffing bribe money under her sweater, says she's not resigning immediately because she wants an orderly transition. Wilkerson made the statement despite a vote by the Massachusetts Senate last week calling on her to give up her seat. Senators also sent the matter to the Senate Ethics Committee.

In a written statement, Wilkerson said she's still planning to resign, but couldn't set a date, noting that there are just "60 days remaining in this legislative session.''  Read more

Tavolo shines as the latest Peabody Square bright spot

Owner Chris Douglass, manager Megan Cullinane, and chef Maxwell Thompson on opening night at Tavolo in August. Photo by Bill Forry  Read more

Uphams shooting spree fatal to bystander

Remembrances at the shooting site. Photo by Pete Stidman

Neighbors say it is a "neutral street," a place where others from all parts of the surrounding neighborhood congregate to hang and drink or smoke. But that crossing of paths on Elder Street near Uphams Corner ended in tragedy during the wee hours of Sunday morning, in a shooting spree that took the life of a 19-year-old mother. Four others survived gunshot wounds in the melee.  Read more

Next great neighborhood' planned for Morrissey site

Future visions of Columbia Point crystallized further last Thursday when Synergy, the owner of a large swath of property that includes the Shaw's on Morrissey Boulevard, unveiled its vision for creating a new "main street" on the site.

Much like developer Corcoran Jennison Cos. is promoting their Bayside on the Point development on the other side of Morrissey, Synergy is touting their own project as "Dorchester's next great neighborhood."  Read more

Dot Farmer's markets tell of summer success stories

The last farmers market of the year was held on Oct. 23 at the Codman Square Health Center. Photo courtesy of Family, Inc.

It's all smiles for neighborhood farmers' market managers, even as the economy is nose-diving. A handful of new markets were successful in their first season and those that have been around report a banner year.  Read more

Feeneys among honorees at Caritas-Carney dinner

Maureen and Larry Feeney

Larry and Maureen Feeney will be among the honorees at this Friday's 24th annual Caritas Carney Hospital Awards Dinner on at the Seaport Hotel in Boston. The Dorchester couple will be the recipients of the Andrew Carney Humanitarians of the Year award.

Larry Feeney has served as the Caritas Carney Foundation Board President for the past three years. Maureen Feeney is the president of the Boston City Council.  Read more

Civic group opposes CVS plan on Dot Ave.

Almost one year after developer Tuankhan "Tony" Vu paid $5 million for a large, oddly shaped property near the intersection of Dorchester Avenue and Pleasant Street, civic groups are rejecting his early drafts for a redevelopment there.

"I feel bad for Tony Vu because I know he's in a financial crunch," said Jones Hill resident Matthew Strauss. "But it's been a lot of frustration. CVS won't budge. I guess they figure they're the only player in this… It's almost like they want to put a suburban mall on this lot."  Read more

Sentences rolling in for Fields Corner gang beating

Three of five adults involved in a brutal youth gang beating that took place in Fields Corner in August, 2007 have been sentenced. Two others have court dates in early December.  Read more

St. Mark's Area restaurant re-opens after break-in

Once again it is Indian chicken Balti on Tuesdays and shepherd's pie on Wednesdays for lunch. After a break-in and a slow-down in business, patrons of Dot2Dot café in the St. Mark's neighborhood come here not only to eat, but also to volunteer.

With help from the neighborhood, the European-style café is back in business after briefly closing its doors.  Read more

Andelman to be honored with service award

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Nov. 5, 2008

A veteran Dorchester activist will be honored for her work to protect public health this week.  The Massachusetts Public Health Association is presenting Davida Andelman with its 2008 Public Service Award at the organization's annual meeting tomorrow.

 The award recognizes Andelman for her "outstanding commitment and dedicated leadership on behalf of public health, environmental justice and social equality in Dorchester and Massachusetts," according to Valerie Bassett, MPHA's Executive Director.  Read more

A main topic: Dianne Wilkerson and the damage done

At dinner tables, on the street and in church in Dorchester, discussions of state Sen. Dianne Wilkerson and what it means for black politics are running apace with those about the first African-American president this country has ever seen.  Read more

Wilkerson fall vexes some

On September 22, less than a week after State Senator Dianne Wilkerson had lost the Democratic primary by 213 votes, dozens of supporters turned out for her at the Prince Hall Grand Lodge in Grove Hall.

They came, not to bury the senator, but to praise her.

Jessenia Castillo told how the senator used her own money to protect her from a threat of violence by making it possible for her to stay at a hotel.

Also giving thanks to the senator were two relatives of Milena Del Valle, who was killed in the collapse of a ceiling panel in a connector tunnel on the Big Dig.  Read more

Political eyes turn to mayoral, council contests

The 2008 presidential race has consumed the attention of the nation and true-blue Boston for nearly a year now, even though Barack Obama has dominated the polls locally. But the Reporter's temperamental seismograph is already picking up tremors from the election one year hence.  Read more

Huge turnout fuels romp for Obama-Biden

Boston politicians of an earlier generation - confident of their election day prowess and popular support - used to brag that City Hall workers would have to "weigh their votes" rather than just count 'em.  Read more

Crossing guard dies from injuries

A Dorchester crossing guard who was run down on a Meetinghouse Hill street died last week. Marie Conley, 58, was hit by a car on the morning of Oct. 21 at the intersection of Parish and Winter streets, just steps from the Mather School. Mrs. Conley, a mother of four, was buried from St. Ann Church in Neponset on Monday. She was laid to rest at New Calvary Cemetery.  Read more

Dianne Wilkerson and the damage done

At dinner tables, on the street and in church in Dorchester, discussions of state Sen. Dianne Wilkerson and what it means for black politics are running apace with those about the first African-American president this country has ever seen.  Read more

NEWS ANALYSIS: Political eyes turn to mayoral, council contests

The 2008 presidential race has consumed the attention of the nation and true-blue Boston for nearly a year now, even though Barack Obama has dominated the polls locally. But the Reporter's temperamental seismograph is already picking up tremors from the election one year hence.  Read more

Obama's victory sparks jubilation in the bars, on the streets

Patrons at the Breezeway Bar and Grille on Blue Hill Ave. react to the news of Barack Obama's election on Tuesday night. Photo by Pete Stidman

His campaign went on for 21 months, the American people sat through over a year of primary and presidential campaigning, and opinion polls predicted a landslide. Yet no one dared believe it was true until the moment Florida flickered blue on TV screens everywhere, and when it became a fact it was overwhelming.  Read more

DotBike spawns imitators in city neighborhoods; Neighborhood-based groups recall bicycling heyday

Bicycling groups aren't yet endorsing candidates for public office, holding back-room meetings at City Hall or clogging the roads with bicycles, but for the first time in decades, the neighborhood-based bike group seems to be back.

DotBike, a small group of dedicated bike commuters, formed during the city's bike summit a year ago, now others are following suit.

In May, Allston-Brighton Bikes took shape. Last week, RozzieBike and JPBike held their first meetings. It's got all the makings of a trend.  Read more

Feeney talks about the Wilkerson debacle

City Council president Maureen Feeney defended her reputation - and lashed out at the alleged corruption of Senator Dianne Wilkerson - in an interview with the Reporter this week. Feeney was among the several elected and appointed officials from the city and state government who were named by their titles in a 32-page affidavit from FBI special agent Krista Corr, which detailed the extortion charges against Wilkerson last week.

In sum, Feeney says her actions were completely on the up and up, and legal.  Read more

New plan closes fewer schools

Supporters of some Boston Public Schools that may be closed received a reprieve last week as the superintendent backed down from a number of facets in her "Pathways to Excellence" plan to reorganize amidst passionate objections from parents, staff and civic leaders. The School Committee was set to vote on the plan Wednesday night, after the Reporter went to print.  Read more

Lena Park cutting programs, may close headquarters

To help cut costs in a worsening economy, Lena Park Community Development Corporation (CDC) told parents last week that it will eliminate its popular daycare and after school programs at its building on American Legion Highway. Asked if the rest of the building might close, interim director Ronald Jones said it hasn't been decided yet, but he didn't rule it out.

In a phone interview Monday, Jones cited rising energy and maintenance costs on the building, rising healthcare costs and contractor's rates, and a shrinking flow of donations.  Read more