News

Three-decker bingo: Lenders continue to pump big money into condos despite foreclosure histories

To judge by sale prices for three-decker condominiums in Dorchester, the housing slump is over - at least at a few locations. The prices do have connections to names that repeatedly turn up in foreclosure filings, and they stick out like tree stumps in a flood of declining values, but that hasn't stopped the flow of credit - whether from small lenders or high-profile companies such as JP Morgan Chase.  Read more

Fuller-Bailey area will get added police presence

Police pledged this week to devote more resources in the area after meeting with community members of the Fuller-Bailey Neighborhood Association. About 40 community members attended the meeting at St. Mark's VFW Post on Tuesday night, primarily revolving around a June 26 shooting on Carmela Lane. Two parents and their baby were almost caught in the middle of the shootout in the small street in between Fuller and Bailey Streets.  Read more

Landmarks Orchestra plays on, honors Dot Park

The Boston Landmarks Orchestra's musicians and audience stayed dry during Sunday's downpours by moving from Dorchester Park, now a registered National Historic Landmark, to St. Gregory School auditorium. Conductor Charles Ansbacher and his orchestra filled the gym with the sounds of George Gerswin and Antonin Dvorak as the rain fell outside. About 200 people braved the weather for the concert, which had been scheduled for Dorchester Park's upper ballfield.  Read more

Geneva housing proposal reveals difference in vision

For a handful of abutters, a proposed affordable housing development at Geneva Avenue and Bloomfield Street is too tall, too dense, and too short on parking.

For six nearby civic associations and Main Streets organizations, other abutters and several civic activists, it's much-needed rental housing and retail that would fill in a vacant lot less than 100 feet from the Fields Corner MBTA Station.  Read more

Membership seeks answers after Viet-AID fires executive director

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Jul. 30, 2008

A group of businesspeople, seniors and other Vietnamese community members are demanding an explanation from Viet-AID's board of directors for dismissing executive director Hiep Chu. The group called a meeting for this coming Saturday to confront the board, ask questions, and "voice the member's level of confidence with the current Viet-AID's board of directors."  Read more

Potentials give '09 citywide run a look

Although some say it's a bit early to talk about Boston City Council election 2009 - particularly with several of this year's state races underway - many, including a handful of political junkies, city hall staffers and the Reporter, just can't help it.  Read more

Festival to shine light on beaches

Organizers expect Aug. 16's Dorchester Beach Festival at Malibu Beach to draw more than a thousand revelers. It was conceived as a way the highlight and take advantage of recent improvements to Dot's beaches, including increased staffing, investment in new safety equipment and more frequent trash collection.  Read more

Council to probe EMS response to infant's shooting

A City Council committee will scrutinize the emergency response to a Fairlawn Avenue shooting that seriously injured a baby last month. Councillor Charles Yancey is calling for next Tuesday's hearing as part of his continued look into the city's 911 system.  Read more

Second meeting set to review Bayside plans

A lack of community interest or the impact of summer holidays could have been what limited the number of attendees at the first community meeting for the proposed Bayside development on Columbia Point.

Less than 50 people showed up on Monday evening at the Boston Redevelopment Authority Article 80 meeting that will help decide the direction a local developer will take the massive shopping, office and residential development in terms of design, density, and mitigation for increased traffic.  Read more

Dot Park, classical music take spotlight on Sunday

Hundreds of spectators are expected to visit Dorchester Park this Sunday evening for a free, outdoor classical concert that will feature the music of George Gershwin and Gospel favorites, a contest for most creative picnic and an official ceremony marking Dorchester Park as a historic site. The Boston Landmarks Orchestra, led by conductor Charles Ansbacher, will headline the festivities, which will begin at 6:30 p.m. at Dorchester Park's main baseball field.  Read more

Lawmakers push for overhaul at Morton-Gallivan intersection

The intersection at Gallivan Boulevard and Morton Street could undergo a study and an overhaul, with members of the State House delegation pushing for the area to get re-done.

"Car accidents happen there almost every day," said Danny Hardaway, president of the Morton Street Chamber of Commerce and owner of the Final Touch With Class boutique.

Pedestrians cross at their own peril, Hardaway said.

"The most dangerous intersection in that district, I would say," said state Rep. Linda Dorcena Forry, a sentiment echoed by state Sen. Jack Hart.  Read more

Teens take ownership as they clean-up Franklin Park

The gem of Frederick Law Olmstead's Emerald Necklace, Franklin Park, is getting a shine this summer. A 32 youth with Franklin Park Coalition and six from Youth Build Boston are working to spruce up areas inside the 527-acre refuge that connects the distinct neighborhoods of Dorchester, Mattapan, Roxbury, and Jamaica Plain.

The Franklin Park Coalition's Summer Youth Conservation crew is made up of teenagers, ages 15 through 18, working in paid positions to improve the grounds, specifically 220-acres of woodlands that are in need of care.  Read more

Viet-AID board fires director

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Jul. 23, 2008

After months of deliberation, the board of the Vietnamese-American Initiative for Development (Viet-AID) terminated its director Hiep Chu last week, sending shockwaves through the Vietnamese and Fields Corner communities where he is respected as a civic leader.

The move was described as a "difference in mission" by former board chair Nina Nguyen, now co-director for the interim, but Chu himself called that reasoning nebulous and said that he is not entirely clear on exactly why he was let go.  Read more

River Street campus celebrates latest round of revitalization

Eight years ago, the sprawling campus of the old Boston Specialty and Rehabilitation Hospital was largely dormant and - in places -crumbling. The shuttered Foley building - the old hospital's battleship building - was a foreboding presence along River Street.

Today, after an investment of more than $80 million in construction costs, the 27 acre campus is buzzing with new homes, streetscapes and amenities.  Read more

Red Line woes keep piling up

The skirmish between federal and state highway authorities over the condition of the Longfellow Bridge- which has led to a 10 mile-per-hour speed restriction as crews check and rehabilitate the span over the Charles River - is not the only factor causing frustration for Red Line commuters in recent months.  Read more

Sunday storm wreaks havoc

An intense thunderstorm burst open over the city at around 3 p.m. on Sunday, dumping one to two inches of rain on Dorchester in less than an hour and firing hundreds of lightning bolts, including one that laid down ten men taking shelter after a soccer game in Harambee Park, also known as Franklin Field.  Read more

Driver takes a bullet through his hat, but is unhurt

An unidentified man pulled over by Boston Police last Friday morning took a bullet through the hat - and lived to tell about it. According to a Boston Police report, officers observed the driver racing the wrong way down Homes Avenue at 2:28 a.m. After he was pulled over, the driver told police that someone had just fired on his car as he was driving by. Officers observed bullet holes on the side of the car and - amazingly - one through the man's hat. The victim sustained no injury and the incident remains under investigation.  Read more

City's foreclosure busters consider new strategies

The city's Foreclosure Intervention Team is taking the neighborhood-saving techniques it honed on Hendry Street to new areas in Dorchester and Roxbury, and brainstorming new ones as they go along.  Read more

Dot actors help bring Bard to Common

"Johnny Lee and me: Two black people from Dorchester who love Shakespeare."

That's how recent Harvard College grad Faith Imafidon describes herself and well-known actor and teacher Johnny Lee Davenport. Both are currently appearing in the Commonwealth Shakespeare Company's production of "As You Like," the annual Free Shakespeare on the Boston Common.  Read more

City's job program fights to keep pace

National teen employment has fallen to pre-World War II levels, according to a study of census data released from Northeastern University this month, and although the overall picture in Massachusetts may be rosier, Mayor Thomas Menino's summer job program has become more important than ever for the city's young people.  Read more

City anti-litter campaign struggles to be born

Just about everyone in Dorchester can agree that a little public education on keeping the neighborhood clean is in order. A good image can help reduce crime, boost business and lift spirits. But when it comes to how that might be accomplished, as some neatniks are finding out, there a few differences of opinion.  Read more

New songs from old church on Dot Ave.

It was a Saturday, not a Sunday, when the former St. William's church had people back in its pews and songs that could be heard out on Dorchester Avenue.

Over 300 people, worshippers from Dorchester, Roxbury, Rhode Island, New York and Cape Verde, came for the first service in the ex-Catholic church, now in the care of Seventh-Day Adventists from Roxbury.

"We are here because God is good," said Pastor Samuel Bulgin, welcoming his congregation to the first service at the church. A chorus of "Amen" followed.  Read more

Local Jamaicans invest in a sweeter future

Boston Diaspora Ventures is a Dorchester-based company with a keen eye for investing in Jamaica. On June 16, the investment group signed an agreement with the All Island Bee Farmers Association of Jamaica, creating a partnership that aims to expand the bee industry on the island and worldwide.

The company invests in projects based in Jamaica, with members from Jamaica, of Jamaican descent, or those who fell in love with the island later in life.  Read more

Neighborhoods largely untouched by Patrick's vetoes

Dorchester and Mattapan appear to have emerged relatively unscathed from an encounter between the state's $28.2 billion budget and Gov. Deval Patrick's veto pen. Patrick on Sunday vetoed $122.5 million out of the budget lawmakers sent to his desk earlier this month.  Read more

Cops probe melee at Neponset pizza shop

Three teenagers were injured Saturday night during a violent brawl outside a Papa Gino's restaurant on Gallivan Boulevard that witnesses said began with a racially-charged dispute between a restaurant employee and customers. Boston Police confirm that the incident is now being investigated by the Community Disorders Unit, which will make a recommendation on whether any civil rights violations occurred.  Read more