News

Food Bank to build new home at South Bay

By 
Chris Bone
Jun. 20, 2007

It doesn't look like much now, but for the 83,000 people in the Boston area without a regular source for food, the nearly three-acre gravel lot baking under the summer sun along I-93 is long overdue.

The South Bay site will support the Greater Boston Food Bank's new 110,000 square-foot distribution center, slated for completion in winter 2008-2009, replacing the current warehouse across the street that can no longer accommodate the Commonwealth's growing hunger problem.  Read more

Lonsdale St. recalls the night when a plane dived out of the misty sky

By 
Tom Mulvoy
Jun. 20, 2007

"It's now 20 years ago," says Dorothy Byrnes McCormack from her home at 38 Lonsdale Street, "but some nights I hear the faraway sound of an approaching airplane and my mind flinches and brings back the memories. It's funny that way; my husband doesn't hear a thing."

Next door, at No. 34, Kathie Tully sometimes hears the drone of an engine, but generally she pays it scant notice. For her, that night was long ago.  Read more

Volunteers create fund to help maintain Dot Park

By 
David Benoit
Jun. 20, 2007

Dorchester Park consists of 26 acres in the heart of the city's largest neighborhood. For many that green space is an oasis, a respite from the thundering concrete of busy roads and the rumbling of trains.  Read more

Local activist Ralph Browne helped push for Juneteenth recognition

By 
David Benoit
Jun. 20, 2007

It was June 19, 1865 when Union General Gordon Granger went into Galveston, Texas and freed the last of the African-Americans being held illegally as slaves. It had been two years since Abraham Lincoln read the Emancipation Proclamation, and two months since his assassination by John Wilkes Booth. Last Saturday, some 142 years later, Massachusetts became the 25th state in the country to recognize Juneteenth as an official day of celebration, with a big hand from Dorchester resident Ralph F. Browne Jr.  Read more

Bulger to join Carney as senior advisor

William M. Bulger, the former president of UMass and the Massachusetts State Senate, will bring his potent rolodex and fundraising prowess to Dorchester this summer, joining Caritas Carney Hospital as a Senior Advisor to the hospital's foundation.

The move, announced Wednesday by hospital president Dr. Daniel H. O'Leary, comes as Carney prepares to move from the control of the Archdiocesan-controlled Caritas Christi Health Care system to a new owner, Ascension Health, a national Catholic chain.  Read more

Mother-daughter team from Savin Hill make history at Harvard

Rosemary Dowling, 79, left, and her daughter Rosemary McCarthy both took degrees from Harvard University last week, marking the first time in the university's long history that a mother and daughter graduated on the same day. Photo: Jeffry Pike/Harvard University.  Read more

Federated's new chief focusing on education, excellence

The man charged with leading Dorchester's largest non-profit social service provider into a new era of stability and growth has a Masters degree in business from Yale, served in the Peace Corps in Thailand and spent a good chunk of his childhood in India.  Read more

New flagpole ready for Edward Everett Square

By 
David Benoit
Jun. 13, 2007

Thursday may be Flag Day, but it is on Friday that the flag will fly again over Edward Everett Square.

Stricken down last summer in the middle of a violent thunderstorm, the old wooden flag pole has been teetering precariously for almost a full year. But on June 15 it will be taken down and replaced with a brand new 100-foot tall fiberglass pole, just in time for the unveiling of other square improvements. And in case lightening does strike twice, the Department of Conservation and Recreation will place a lighting rod in the middle of the poll to keep it safe.  Read more

Community hears city's plans for Fields Corner MBTA station area

By 
David Benoit
Jun. 13, 2007

With construction on the Fields Corner MBTA station nearing completion, city officials took the time Tuesday night in Fields Corner to discuss with the community some newly proposed plans for the streets and areas around the station. The new plans, presented by Dick Hardy of the Boston Transportation Department, pertain to parking and traffic flow problems in the area.  Read more

Housing unit will build new Dot Ave. headquarters

The Massachusetts Affordable Housing Alliance is poised to break ground on a brand new classroom and office facility at 1803 Dorchester Avenue, the first time the organization will own its own property since beginning education programs for prospective homebuyers over 20 years ago.

"Our move to Dorchester mirrored our increasing neighborhood focus," said Thomas Callahan, MAHA's executive director, of the move they made to Dorchester from downtown about ten years ago. "A permanent home in Dorchester is really a sign of our commitment to homeownership in the neighborhoods."  Read more

Dunkin' proposal gets cool reception at Pope's Hill

A plan to remodel the Li'l Peach convenience store on Neponset Avenue was met with some resistance from Popes Hill neighbors last week, largely because of a potential facet of that plan to add a Dunkin' Donuts counter and a drive-thru window to the store.  Read more

Rain can't dampen spirits along Dot Day parade route

Noontime. There is already a mist in the air by the Common Ground restaurant in Lower Mills. This reporter has the pleasure of riding in a shiny, bright blue Mustang convertible with three lovely girls, none other than Little Miss Dorchester 2007, Vany Cardoso, and runners-up Paige McEachern and Kaysea Ruffin. Excited and maybe a little nervous, we all practice waving to the early birds eagerly awaiting the beginning of the Dorchester Day Parade.

Across the street, politicians, war veterans, and police officers chat and tie up loose ends.  Read more

Bayside execs envision massive transformation on Columbia Point

A new mix of residential, commercial and open space would replace the box-shaped confines of Bayside Expo Center under a conceptual plan discussed today by executives from Corcoran Jennison Companies, owners of the waterfront land in Columbia Point.

Corcoran Jennison Companies has unveiled a concept to completely redevelop 21.5 acres of property on Columbia Point as a mixed use residential and retail destination at a cost that could approach $1 billion.  Read more

Lena Park program helps neighbors prepare for new careers

By 
Martine Louis
May. 29, 2007

In a program designed to give second chances, Lena Park Community Development Corporation's Training, Education and Job Advancement Center (TedJac) has changed many lives. TedJac was created for the people who, for some reason or other, were not able to obtain a degree previously.

Over the past year there have been 23 graduates, ages varying from 21 to 66, with a 100 percent success rate of employment. On May 24, fifteen men and women graduated from the Construction and Property Management course in a ceremony held at Lena Park's headquarters on American Legion Highway.  Read more

Mattapan connection sought for Greenway

By 
Bill Forry and Patrick McGroarty
May. 29, 2007

A key, unfinished segment of the planned Neponset River Greenway system must run between the current terminus of the bike trail at Central Avenue in Milton and Mattapan Square. While a master plan for phase two of the Greenway system, released last year by the Department of Conservation and Recreation, gives a good roadmap for how to bring the trail from the Blue Hills to Mattapan Square, the riverfront connection between Central Ave. and the square remains unresolved in the plan.

The key issue, to date: Which side of the river should the trail run down?  Read more

A few rounds with Craig Galvin, Mayor of Dorchester

By 
David Benoit
May. 29, 2007

Craig Galvin strode into the Minot Mud House on Tuesday morning to practically a hero's welcome. Some jabs from a friend, a few yells from the counter sitters, and the Mayor of Dorchester was automatically at ease in his "artificial office," as he calls it. Galvin seems to be at his best surrounded by the people, which is one of the reasons he says he threw his hat into the ceremonial mayoral ring. As he prepares for his first day "in office" this weekend at the Dorchester Day Parade, he took some time to sit with the press for a short interview at headquarters.  Read more

Local beaches improved, but report cites lack of maintenance

Just in time for summer temperatures, Gov. Deval Patrick last week appointed Westfield Mayor Richard Sullivan to head the Department of Conservation and Recreation.

Like others coming into new administration jobs, Sullivan has a tall order in front of him: managing the state's parks as the agency recovers from budget cuts past and present. But the waterfront, particularly that in the Greater Boston area, figures in big as well.  Read more

Motley likely to put own stamp on UMass-Boston campus life

By 
Gintautas Dumcius and Patrick McGroarty
May. 22, 2007

Call it a do-over of sorts. Echoing a similar scene from nearly three years ago, Keith Motley last week returned to UMass-Boston to once again assume the chancellorship while surrounded by family and several of his mentors. This time, it's said to be permanent.  Read more

Collins to depart, Motley take helm at UMass-Boston

By 
By Patrick McGroarty and Bill Forry
May. 15, 2007

Dr. Michael F. Collins will leave his post as chancellor of UMass-Boston this summer to become the interim chancellor of the UMass Medical School in Worcester. Collins, who has led the Dorchester campus for less than two years, will be replaced by Dr. J. Keith Motley, a UMass vice-president who served as UMass-Boston's interim chancellor prior to Collins's appointment.  Read more

Gladeside Wild getting some overdue TLC

By 
Sasha Link
May. 15, 2007

Hiking through an nature preserve filled with salamanders, frogs, birds and a diversified formation of trees may seem like a destination you'd have to pack an overnight bag to get to.

It isn't.

The Gladeside Urban Wild, located off River Street and Lorna Road in Mattapan, boasts all of these things, and right in our own backyard.  Read more

Everett school second-grader wins Little Miss crown

By 
Martine Louis
May. 15, 2007

Eight year-old Vany Cardoso - the newest Little Miss Dorchester- was just one of the 28 girls who dazzled the judges and audience that gathered at the First Parish Church last Saturday, for the annual contest. The number one goal of the event, which has been part of the annual Dorchester Day celebrations for decades now, is to "have fun and help girls build confidence in public speaking," says Annissa George, the event coordinator.  Read more

Lawmakers keep focus on planned Fairmount stops at Monday meeting

A modest crowd came indoors on a beautiful spring evening Monday to participate in a forum sponsored by state elected officials who represent communities along the Fairmount Commuter Rail Line, the aging MBTA rail line poised to undergo a major renovation project. The forum was co-sponsored by state Sen. Jack Hart, and state Representatives Liz Malia and Marie St. Fleur.  Read more

Youth center pushed at 2d meeting

The man who brutally stabbed 27-year-old Betina Francois to death in 2004 spent the last two-and-a-half years mounting a defense, in which he claimed to have killed his estranged girlfriend in self-defense. It took a Plymouth County jury less than an hour on Monday to reject his claims and send him to jail for the rest of his life.

Francois, a popular Mattapan Community Health Center employee, died at the hands of Pierre Cadet, her estranged boyfriend who stabbed her to death in her Brockton apartment when he feared that he might go to jail for repeatedly threatening her life.  Read more

Facelift in the works for Codman Cemetery

By 
Chris Bone
May. 9, 2007

You probably never look at it, but Rev. Dr. Victor Price and Paul Malkemes do every day.

They are determined to turn the ivy-laden eyesore of rusted fences, decayed trees and dissipation known as Codman Cemetery into a magnetic, manicured haven for residents and curious historians throughout Codman Square and beyond.  Read more

LaBelle Capoise is a dream come true

By 
Sasha Link
May. 9, 2007

When Francina Theodore left Haiti to come to America more than ten years ago, she left behind a highly desirable possession: a family owned and operated restaurant. Upon arriving in the states, she spent the next few years dreaming of opening a new restaurant here in America, similar to the one she had run in Cap-Haitien, a city of about 130,000 people on the north coast of Haiti.

Teaming up with her son, Emmanuel Beliard, Theodore quickly realized her dream with the launch of a small, take-out Haitian restaurant on Morton Street.  Read more