Schools

Marshall Community Center faces big challenge

Bill Milligan: Marshall Community Center council chairman speaks at a meeting last week. Photo by Pete StidmanBill Milligan: Marshall Community Center council chairman speaks at a meeting last week. Photo by Pete StidmanOf the three community centers set to lose city funding for some of their preschool or after school teachers come January, the Marshall may have the biggest challenges before it.  Read more

Neponset site helps connect to youth programs

The Pope's Hill Neighborhood Association has created a one-stop web page for parents looking for resources for their children for April vacation, the summer months and beyond.  Read more

Murphy Center closing for summer

Just as parents and neighbors have activated en masse to boost the Murphy Community Center’s use by local teens, the city is finally getting around to making a few crucial repairs that will cause it to close down for the entire summer.

The move, which was announced last week, came as a shock to parents, particularly those involved in a recent surge of community involvement in the center, which produced 19 new members for the center’s site council in January.  Read more

Hearing to focus on temporary shut-down at Murphy Center

City Councillor Maureen Feeney has scheduled a hearing for Tuesday evening (April 7) to scrutinize a plan that would temporarily close the Murphy Community Center for renovations this summer.  Read more

Budget straits spark surge in parent action

One silver lining of the stormy budget crisis that has loomed over the Boston Public Schools for the past few months— a crisis that still threatens 212 teaching positions and 324 other jobs unless new revenues or budget cuts are found—is that hundreds of parents have come out of the woodwork to protect their children’s education.

With plenty of studies showing parental involvement can improve student and school performance, many active parents and advocates are now beginning to wonder if any of the energy that brought 500 parents to a State House rally last week can be sustained.  Read more

Codman Square pins hopes on stimulus for new center, school

Codman Square Health Campus: An architect's rendering of the proposed new building. Courtesy HKT ArchitectsCodman Square Health Campus: An architect's rendering of the proposed new building. Courtesy HKT ArchitectsAn ambitious $15 million plan to build a new health center and school in the heart of Codman Square could begin as soon as September if federal stimulus dollars earmarked for community health centers come through.  Read more

Grants allow art teachers to travel and expand their own horizons

Jozeph Zaremba, a longtime Dorchester art teacher will at last get in touch with his artist roots – by studying in Florence.

“Wow! I am so excited to receive a Teachers as Artists grant!  It allows me to become a student again and validates the importance of art in teaching and learning,” he said this week.  Read more

What fouled the Mildred Middle School site?

A curious septuagenarian caller, known to the Reporter but shy about putting her name in the paper, called in this week to question the previous existence of a dry cleaner on Mildred Avenue—where vapors from tetrachloroethylene, a.k.a: perc, were found inside a middle school last month.  Read more

Chemical vapors found at Mildred Ave. Middle School

A trace amount of vapors from the dry cleaning chemical tetrachloroethylene, also known as perc, has been detected at the Mildred Avenue Middle School in Mattapan. The school was completed in 2003 on a handful of formerly industrial sites that were cleaned up and patched together by the city.

Boston Public Schools and the Department of Environmental Protection both agree that the amount detected in air quality tests is not enough to be threat to students, but plans are being made to address the problem before it gets any worse.  Read more

Patrick channels stimulus to stanch UMass fee hikes

By 
Gintautas Dumcius Reporter Correspondent
Mar. 26, 2009

Undergraduates at UMass-Boston and other public college campuses won’t be getting as big a fee hike as expected in their bills come later this year.

Originally set at a $1,500 spike, students could see a hike as small $300, due to $162 million in federal stimulus funds that Gov. Deval Patrick is directing to the state’s public colleges and universities in a bid to stall fee hikes and prevent cuts in faculty and programs.  Read more