Sports

Dorchester Red Sox win citywide softball title

By 
Brianna MacGregor, Special to the Reporter
Aug. 12, 2013

The Dorchester champs included players (front kneeling, l-r) Caroline O'Brien, Michela Juliano, Holly Silva, Hannah Silva and Gabby Kehayias. Middle row: Brenna Galvin, Katie Nolan, Mikayla O'Dowd, Reilly Hayes and Amanda Stefura. Back row: Coach Richard O'Brien, Maddie Connolly, Ashley Penella, RBI Director Jose Ruiz BPD, Lucy Caffrey-Maffei, Danielle Rood and Maureen Penella. Missing from photo: Clare Duckworth, Bridget Collins, Nicole Anderson and Jackie Clark.

Finishing off a victorious summer season, the Dorchester Red Sox softball team beat a fellow Dot team, the Dorchester Rangers, last week to claim the citywide championship . In an exciting first game last Tuesday night, the two teams were neck and neck until the Red Sox won by a single run in the bottom of the seventh inning. On Thursday, the Red Sox were victorious again and clinched the championship series.  Read more

Shining link in the Emerald Necklace: Devine golf course in Franklin Park

By 
Tom Mulvoy, Reporter Staff
Aug. 8, 2013

City jewel: The third green at the Devine Course at Franklin Park beckons from 421 yards away as this free-swinger finishes his tee-shot backswing. Photo by Bill ForryCity jewel: The third green at the Devine Course at Franklin Park beckons from 421 yards away as this free-swinger finishes his tee-shot backswing. Photo by Bill Forry

As the sun slowly climbed into the August-blue eastern sky on Tuesday morning, Russell Heller and Dennis Roache sat down in the small patio outside the clubhouse at the William J. Devine Golf Course at Franklin Park to talk a bit about the expanse of fetching greensward in front of them.  Read more

From 20 rows back on that night in 1962, I watched as one man died, and the other’s life began to unravel

Back in the spring of 1962, while indentured to the US Army as a Private E-1 doing basic training at Fort Dix, New Jersey, I landed a weekend pass allowing me to ramble up to the Big City to catch the fights. It’s funny how sometimes encounters with the historic can just fall in your lap.  Read more

At the All-Star break, imponderables to ponder

Sitting here pondering the imponderable on Bastille Day – an appropriate occasion commemorating a moment when the world got turned upside down – you hassle with this vexing question: “When did sport become devoutly topsy-turvy and might the malaise be permanent?” Perched on the sideline for two weeks scanning in utter detachment the madness of the give and take offers a ripe education. Re-consider just a handful of the daunting issues a mere fortnight yields:  Read more

Still waiting on Tyler Seguin to make his own case

The young woman at the side of the pool at the jam-packed July 4th barbecue was quick with her response when she overheard a few guys talking about the mid-holiday announcement that the Boston Bruins had traded a much touted 21-year-old named Tyler Seguin to the NHL team in Dallas as the key move in a deal involving seven players in all.  Read more

Baseball reality is short-changing the spendthrift Yankees

A sterling factoid brilliantly illustrating the current state of baseball affairs is this little nugget culled from the madness rampant in the turbulent American League East: Over the last five seasons (2008-2012), during which the New York Yankees and Tampa Rays have been slugging it out year after year, the Yankees have won a grand total of 21 more games than the Rays. But it has cost them in player salaries alone a tidy $560 million more than what the Rays expended in payroll those years.  Read more

Can Bruins possibly top what they have done so far?

As the Bruins roar into the Stanley Cup Finals, looking more and more like a runaway freight train on razor-sharp blades, many should be pardoned for wondering if what’s left to be done is somehow anti-climactic.

In the end, a certain historical necessity insists the Cup will be the ultimate measure of this team. But no matter how this rich and moving saga does end, nothing can diminish all the wild and crazy stuff that has glorified the mad dash to the ultimate moment. As the saying goes, the Bruins are playing with “house money” in these Finals. How terrific is that?  Read more

What place sports when a tragedy strikes?

There has always been a bit of disconnect between the games we play and times of distress. Sports equate with “fun” and are classified as “entertainment.” So when bad things happen, ought the games to be stopped? Are they appropriate when their relative unimportance is resoundingly underscored by the bitter sweep of harsh reality? Should we be happily at play when and where great sadness abounds?

These are hardly questions that drive philosophers daft, merely the stuff of common sense. Yet the answers have not always been clear while consensus remains elusive.  Read more

PLAY BALL! 'Overwhelming' response to news of Little League theft

This equipment locker was broken into and pillaged by unknown persons over the weekend. Photo by Bill Forry

Donations and equipment are pouring into Savin Hill Little League today after news reports about a weekend theft that wiped out the league's equipment locker at McConnell Park went viral yesterday evening.

The little league has fielded calls and donations from all over Massachusetts, including one from Red Sox catcher Jarrod Saltalamacchia. The Quincy-based charity Good Sports has pledged to deliver $4,000 in new equipment and uniforms to the little league in time for the opening of their season later this month.

"Its been overwhelming support from the neighborhood and across the city and state," said Michael Christopher, one of the league's organizers. "It makes you feel good and you realize how unique and special this place is that people step up when something like this happens."  Read more

Youthful life at Bird St. Center spurred Juan De Jesus to fulfill dream

From Columbia Rd. to Major League Baseball: Juan DeJesus cultivated skills at Bird Street Community Center.From Columbia Rd. to Major League Baseball: Juan DeJesus cultivated skills at Bird Street Community Center.Juan De Jesus doesn’t get home much these days. The Uphams Corner native is on the road most of the year in Latin America, where he works for Major League Baseball (MLB) to recruit, cultivate, and streamline the entry of young ballplayers into the United States.

It’s a dream job for the 30-year-old De Jesus, a graduate of BC High and Boston College. His mom and dad emigrated to Dorchester from the Dominican Republic. Baseball is in his blood, to be sure. His father knew many pro ball players from his hometown in the D.R. — and DeJesus fancied himself a bit of Fenway Park “rat” — often getting special access to watch batting practice before games.

But it was through his involvement with the Bird Street Community Center on Columbia Road that he learned to play and love the game.  Read more