Sports

NFL’s shame: Old-school vets stiffed by players, league

When the admirable Houston Antwine quietly departed this mortal coil the other day some strong and sweet memories of the way the game used to be were stirred among those of us privileged to have been around when the American Football League was winning the struggle to gain a toehold in skeptical towns like Boston thanks entirely to guys like ‘Twine’. The tributes were touching.  Read more

Hayes impresses in first games for Blackhawks

By 
Reporter Staff
Jan. 5, 2012

Jimmy Hayes was called up to the big leagues last Friday – and notched his first career NHL goal on Monday. Photo courtesy blackhawks.com

If you’ve started to notice more and more neighbors walking around Adams Corner sporting the distinctive red jerseys of the Chicago Blackhawks this week, there’s a very good reason for the otherwise treasonous offense: Dot’s own Jimmy Hayes made his regular season NHL debut last Friday night for the Blackhawks during a home game against the Detroit Red Wings.  Read more

New boxing club hopes to build talent, confidence

By 
Corey Burns, Special to the Reporter
Jan. 5, 2012

Jason Kelly, Zachary Fenton, and Anthony Hines at the newly-opened Dorchester Boxing Club. Photo by Corey Burns

The newly-minted Dorchester Boxing Club is tucked away inside a concrete building on the short end of Parkman Street, just off the busy intersection of Neponset Avenue and Adams Street. The gym’s occupants put their work in behind a garage door of the old warehouse just behind a funeral home.

The gym, which opened its doors three weeks ago, is run by Savin Hill’s Dan Kelly, 55, and his son Jason, 20, who is a certified personal trainer with prior experience at the Boston Sports Club in Fenway and also a USA Boxing certified coach.  Read more

Mattahunt Center re-opens with wide array of activities

By 
Alex Owens, Special to the Reporter
Oct. 19, 2011

Mattahunt Center: Cheerleaders from Mattapan Pop Warner helped celebrate the center's re-opening last week. Photo by Alex OwensMattahunt Center: Cheerleaders from Mattapan Pop Warner helped celebrate the center's re-opening last week. Photo by Alex OwensThe grand re-opening of the Mattahunt Community Center was celebrated last Thursday, capping off an unprecedented transition from city-run facility to a center privately managed by Wheelock College that could serve as a model for future community centers across Boston.

Guests were invited to explore some of the programming to be offered at the center, which closed abruptly due to city budget cuts in spring 2010. The various athletic organizations affiliated with the Mattahunt-Wheelock Partnership held clinics for younger visitors while parents had the chance to talk with several groups about the upcoming services to be provided at the Mattahunt.  Read more

Good luck, Terry Francona, and watch your back

At the end of March on the eve of the 2011 baseball season, 36 of the game’s certified “experts” submitted their predictions about how the season would go and who would emerge triumphant. Banal as the exercise may be, it’s a custom as ingrained as the whistling of “Take Me out to the Ballgame” and as fundamental as peanuts and crackerjacks.  Read more

Bruins' sensation Tyler Seguin scores big with kids

By 
Pat Tarantino, Reporter Staff
Sep. 14, 2011

Tyler Seguin at Leahy-Holloran Community Center: The Bruins center handed out pucks and opening day tickets on Tuesday. Reporter photo by Pat TarantinoTyler Seguin at Leahy-Holloran Community Center: The Bruins center handed out pucks and opening day tickets on Tuesday. Reporter photo by Pat Tarantino
Kids at Dorchester’s Leahy-Holloran Community Center had a brush with greatness on Tuesday, when Boston Bruins center Tyler Seguin made a surprise appearance. After being met with a round of applause and cheers, Seguin announced that each of the 20 youngsters and a parent would be attending the Bruins’ October 6 home opener.  Read more

NCAA to reform big-time football? It is to laugh

For those who have been ranting and raving about this subject for about four decades, this ought to amount to some sort of moment of redemption.

The lid is off. The truth is beyond dispute. No one with sense enough to come in out of the rain will stoop to argue the point. The pathetic hypocrisies and abject double standards that have sustained the system’s runaway corruption are at last fully exposed. Not even the silliest yahoos, to whom the gridiron glories of good old Winsocki are dearer than life itself, will defend the nuttiness of the business any longer.  Read more

Safe Summer Streets Basketball League Championships

The 16-team Safe Summer Streets Basketball League concluded play in late August with the championship games for all three divisions of play. In the 4-team Girls division the Lady Thunder defeated the Lady Cavs in the first of two semi-final games, 59-52. Candace Andrews (30) led the Lady Thunder while Markiah Monteiro (40) led the Lady Cavs. In the second game The Lady Zags, behind Regina Crawford (39) defeated the Lady Tigers 51-40. Cadejia Matthews (19) led the Lady Tigers offense.  Read more

Swimming pool re-opens to public at Mattahunt Center

By 
Michael Caprio, Special to the Reporter
Aug. 11, 2011

After being closed for more than one year, the Mattahunt Community Center pool is now open to the public again. The re-opening follows an effort by Wheelock College to help kickstart the center’s programming back into gear as the school year approaches.  Read more

Who knew? At first, no one but the Bruins

Toast of the town: Kostas Klokelis, from Framingham, Mass., toasts from a window overlooking the duck boats carrying the Boston Bruins and their families as they roll through downtown during a rally in celebration of their NHL hockey Stanley Cup playoff victory Saturday, June 18. AP PhotoToast of the town: Kostas Klokelis, from Framingham, Mass., toasts from a window overlooking the duck boats carrying the Boston Bruins and their families as they roll through downtown during a rally in celebration of their NHL hockey Stanley Cup playoff victory Saturday, June 18. AP PhotoIn the end what made it so grand and unforgettable was the simple fact that it all came barreling out of nowhere like a spectacular thunderstorm late on a hot summer day. It was totally unheralded. No one expected it. No one predicted it. And even as it was happening, no one believed it would lead to where it led. Great sporting moments are always best when they take you completely by surprise.

What made this adventure notably delicious was that it stretched over two full months – 9 weeks/63 days – building slowly, relentlessly, impossibly, and allowing us time to catch the rhythm of the thing and fall in step.

Like Ravel’s Bolero, it began with low and guttural notes that were almost morose, gradually climbing, note after note and beat after beat, steadily rising in tone with an ever more pounding intensity and surging every couple of days until at last a certain inevitability held sway and we realized we were headed for the brink and it became only a question of how hard we might land when the music came crashing to a close.  Read more