Public Safety

Panel offers ideas on urban violence

Access to substance abuse treatment for all regardless of income, mandatory K-12 bullying and violence prevention programs, and aggressive steps to reduce access to illegal firearms are among the anti-urban violence recommendations released last Thursday by the governor's Anti-Crime Council.

Other recommendations include immediate steps to offer reentry supports to violent offenders, job training for individuals between 14 and 22 years old, and the establishment of ways to immediately respond to and treat children who witness violence.  Read more

Judge orders evaluation for suspect in bus attack

In Dorchester District Court Tuesday, Judge David Poole ordered a 20-day mental evaluation for 32-year-old Steven Phillips, who allegedly flashed two teenage girls on the Route 23 MBTA bus just before 3 p.m. on Monday, and then stabbed them both. Phillips will be sent to Bridgewater State Hospital for the evaluation, on a recommendation by the court's clinician.  Read more

Stats show serious crime down citywide and locally

Statistics released this week by the Boston Police Department show a slow-down in serious crime across the city, with significant reductions in our neighborhood's two main police districts, C-11 and B-3, compared to last year's figures. The good news is relative: Homicides are well up this year in C-11, where 2008 began with a flurry of gun violence that has slowed, but not ceased, in recent months.  Read more

Cold weather doesn't mean reprieve on crime

There is some encouraging news on the public safety front this week. As we report this week on Page One, official Boston Police statistics show some progress has been made in reducing violence on the streets of Dorchester and Mattapan.  Read more

St. Mark's Area restaurant re-opens after break-in

Once again it is Indian chicken Balti on Tuesdays and shepherd's pie on Wednesdays for lunch. After a break-in and a slow-down in business, patrons of Dot2Dot café in the St. Mark's neighborhood come here not only to eat, but also to volunteer.

With help from the neighborhood, the European-style café is back in business after briefly closing its doors.  Read more

Uphams shooting spree fatal to bystander

Remembrances at the shooting site. Photo by Pete Stidman

Neighbors say it is a "neutral street," a place where others from all parts of the surrounding neighborhood congregate to hang and drink or smoke. But that crossing of paths on Elder Street near Uphams Corner ended in tragedy during the wee hours of Sunday morning, in a shooting spree that took the life of a 19-year-old mother. Four others survived gunshot wounds in the melee.  Read more

Sentences rolling in for Fields Corner gang beating

Three of five adults involved in a brutal youth gang beating that took place in Fields Corner in August, 2007 have been sentenced. Two others have court dates in early December.  Read more

Crossing guard dies from injuries

A Dorchester crossing guard who was run down on a Meetinghouse Hill street died last week. Marie Conley, 58, was hit by a car on the morning of Oct. 21 at the intersection of Parish and Winter streets, just steps from the Mather School. Mrs. Conley, a mother of four, was buried from St. Ann Church in Neponset on Monday. She was laid to rest at New Calvary Cemetery.  Read more

Dot service station named in emissions scam; Owner denies 'Joe the Fish' was used at station

Attorney General Martha Coakley's office charged seven emissions inspection stations with conducting illegal clean scans of cars that should not have passed the test last week, including one from Dorchester.  Read more

Everyone has a 'Walter Fahey story'

The following article about former Boston Police officer Walter Fahey was published in the Reporter in 1997. Walter passed away last week at age 76.

In 1957, the year Walter Fahey became a cop, the Soviets launched Sputnik, Ted Williams hit a robust .388 and the tallest building in Boston, the John Hancock tower, was a mere 26 stories high.  Read more