News

Pit stop with a purpose

It is 10:30 on a humid Friday morning and the Fair Foods truck is on time. So are their customers.

The line queuing up to the back of the truck parked at the corner of Adams and Whitten Streets is 10 deep, each customer eager to know what today's surplus will afford. Today there are potatoes and onions, just like last week's shipment. But there is also corn, and bottles of soda, too.  Read more

An entrepreneur's lab rises in an old UMass dining hall

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By
Aug. 27, 2008

An old cafeteria on the fifth floor of UMass-Boston's science building is being transformed this summer into a research and development "innovation" center that will allow entrepreneurs to conduct experiments and prepare new products for the marketplace with the aide of UMass faculty and students. The Venture Development Center (VDC) will mark UMass-Boston's first foray into a rapidly expanding field of on-campus innovation incubators that could bolster the university's position in recruitment and retention of faculty and students.  Read more

MyTown tours contemplates Fields Corner as next stop

A popular teen program that shepherds tourists down the side streets and lost histories of the South End is being courted for a possible expansion into Fields Corner.

Historic Boston Inc. helped bring a stable of Fields Corner figures together for a MyTown tour of the South End's Columbus Avenue last Wednesday and afterward feted tourists and tour guides alike at a Vietnamese noodle shop nearby, all to help put a new spotlight onto the corner's history.  Read more

Shootings erupt on a bloody Monday evening

Parts of Dorchester erupted in gunfire on Monday night, part of spasm of violence across the city that included the shooting of a 4 year-old boy in Roxbury. In the span of a few short hours, there were shootings reported on Hamilton Street, Harvard Street, Shafter Street and Callender Street.  Read more

Loyalty card program gets renewed push

Just in time for Christmas shopping in 2006, the city of Boston announced a first-of-its-kind customer loyalty card that was to create a symbiotic relationship between local businesses, pennywise shoppers and community-based non-profits and schools. A year and a half and countless hours of work later, the system has earned precious few donations for its beneficiaries, just passing the $8,000 mark this week.

But it's still a good idea.  Read more

Country cooking in a blessed location

If you're not a member of the Morning Star Baptist or Metropolitan Baptist churches or a resident on Middleton Street, you likely haven't yet heard about Anns Heavenly Cuisine. But beyond an unassuming side door with one little sign hanging over it, down a flight of stairs and amidst a plain-Jane church basement with eight yellow-clad tables and 32 folding chairs, Annie Moore is serving up the real southern country cooking to the public every weekend. The real.  Read more

Missing in action: owners who live at home; Investors dominate multi-family market

On a single dead-end street on Meetinghouse Hill, two extremes of Dorchester's troubled multi-family housing market can be found side by side. The difference between these two three-deckers on Navillus Terrace - creatively named for a man named Sullivan - reflects market price, but also conjures up a fortune-telling vision for the neighborhood.  Read more

Neighbors get sneak peek at new Mattapan library

No opening date has been set yet, but the new Mattapan Library is swiftly becoming a reality on Blue Hill Avenue. Members of the task force that advised the city on its construction got an advance tour on Monday, just to see if there were any lingering concerns from the group.  Read more

Drop-out bill establishes commission

Gov. Deval Patrick last week signed a bill aimed at reducing the school drop-out rate by setting up a commission to look into the problem. The bill (S 2766) was shepherded through the Legislature by Dorchester's state Rep. Marie St. Fleur.

Boston has a 40 percent drop-out rate, according to Lew Finfer, executive director of the Massachusetts Communication Action Network. Dropouts also earn $465,000 less in their lifetime than high school graduates.  Read more

Chang-Diaz releases poll showing lead over Wilkerson

Seeking to build momentum heading into the Sept. 16 Democratic primary, state Sen. Dianne Wilkerson's challenger Sonia Chang-Diaz this week released an internal poll showing the veteran lawmaker down by 17.5 percent.

In a poll taken last week of 417 likely Democratic primary voters, Chang-Diaz outpolled Wilkerson by 47.2 percent to 29.7 percent. Twenty-three percent were undecided. The margin of error is 4.8 percent.  Read more

Union funds anti-violence push that's aimed at kids

The city's violence prevention efforts received a boost this week after the state's largest healthcare workers' union handed over a $200,000 check for a new marketing campaign aimed at youth in violence-plagued neighborhoods.

"We're really aiming for marketing that's for youth by youth," said Barbara Ferrer, head of the Boston Public Health Commission.  Read more

Drop-out bill establishes commission

Gov. Deval Patrick last week signed a bill aimed at reducing the school drop-out rate by setting up a commission to look into the problem. The bill (S 2766) was shepherded through the Legislature by Dorchester's state Rep. Marie St. Fleur.

Boston has a 40 percent drop-out rate, according to Lew Finfer, executive director of the Massachusetts Communication Action Network. Dropouts also earn $465,000 less in their lifetime than high school graduates.  Read more

A day at Dot's beaches: Festival draws crowds to sands of Malibu, Savin Hill

The weather this summer has been spotty at best, with an unusual amount of cloudy days and copious amounts of rainfall, enough to dampen even the sunniest of dispositions.

But last Saturday, Aug. 16, dawned bright and sunny, the temps reached into the low 80s, and the long-planned revival of a return to Dot's bountiful beaches came off with nary a hitch.  Read more

Businesses hope to recover after Uphams fire

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By
Aug. 13, 2008

A midnight blaze tore through King Zion's Den on Hancock Street on Aug. 3. The African collectibles retailer and two other stores sustianed some $600,000 in damage, according to a Boston Fire Department estimate.

Fire Chief Bill Meyer attributed the fire to a short circuit of some kind.  Read more

Mining for sewer overflow tunnel completed early

A giant custom-made mining machine the size of a six-car subway train emerged from the ground on the Dorchester border next to Carson beach yesterday. The machine took a year to build, but finished its 2.1 mile-long, 17-foot-in-diameter slog through sand, gravel and Boston blue clay all the way from Conley Terminal next to Castle Island in eleven months, over six months ahead of schedule.  Read more

Coalition gears up "New Bostonians" for election 2008

A wide array of ethnic community organizations and lobbying groups are banding together to push for higher registration rolls heading into the September primary and the November election.

Launched last week and spearheaded by the Mayor Thomas Menino's Office of New Bostonians, the campaign has already brought the figure to 300 people, according to early estimates from officials involved in the effort.  Read more

UMass starts design on new science building

By 
By
Aug. 13, 2008

A digital rendering of the Campus Center at UMass-Boston with the proposed science building in the background. Courtesy of UMass-Boston

Now that Gov. Deval Patrick has signed the $2.2 billion higher education bond bill - $125 million of which will go for improvements at the UMass-Boston campus - college administrators are hot to trot to begin transforming the 70s-era Columbia Point campus that is often referred to as a 'fortress' or a 'prison.'  Read more

Two held after gun flashed at Garvey

By 
By
Aug. 13, 2008

An 18-year-old Brockton man and a 16 year-old Dorchester teen were arrested Sunday night after they allegedly flashed a loaded 9 millimeter handgun and waved a knife during a dispute on the street hockey court at Garvey Park in Neponset. Police were called to the city-owned Neponset Avenue park around 10:30 p.m. on Sunday. According to a police report, two victims at the park reported that an assailant in a hooded sweatshirt had pulled the gun on a group of young people before fleeing the park. No one was injured in the incident.  Read more

BPD's Safe Streets deployment getting high marks after first year

A Boston Police deployment that saturates city villages with targeted, daily foot patrols is getting strong reviews from community activists after its first full year of implementation. First employed in the spring of 2007 - and then launched more broadly in several Dorchester and Mattapan villages last summer - Operation Safe Streets has become the signature strategy of Commissioner Edward Davis's two-year-old administration and is likely to expand into new sections of the city in coming months - including Uphams Corner.  Read more

City moves on Hendry rehab

The wheels of Boston's Foreclosure Intervention Team (FIT) churn on this week, as housing officials approved a developer for four city-owned three-deckers on blighted Hendry Street.

On Tuesday, the Boston Redevelopment Authority board put their seal of approval on Bilt-Rite, a Roxbury-based developer that the FIT recommended over three other bidders. The selection opens the door for the city's first redevelopment of properties acquired directly from the banks that foreclosed on them, at least during the current crisis.  Read more

In Boston, Feds say naturalization process will accelerate

By 
Kyle Cheney, State House News Service
Aug. 13, 2008

Tens of thousands of Massachusetts immigrants may find out sooner rather than later about the status of their naturalization requests.

Pointing to progress in processing millions of naturalization applications nationally, U.S. immigration officials announced Tuesday that the average time of processing is expected to drop six to eight months by the end of September.  Read more

Sketches outline new-deal for Columbia Point

A hand-drawn schematic shows new roads and traffic flows envisioned by city-hired urban planners. The two double-pointed arrows in blue indicate a new road through the proposed Bayside development from Day Blvd. to Morrissey Blvd. and a Mt. Vernon Street without 'the chute.' In orange is Morrissey without its frontage roads.  Read more

Patrick's town meeting now an 'informal meet and greet'

When the governor's office rolled out plans for an 11-stop, town meeting tour of the state in early July, Boston residents were cheered to see that it included a stop locally. In a press release in July, the governor's office included Boston's Caribbean Day Parade on Aug. 23 as one of the 11 town meetings.  Read more

Two arrested after gun is pulled at Neponset park

A 18 year-old Brockton man and a 16 year-old Dorchester teen were arrested Sunday night after they allegedly flashed a loaded 9 millimeter handgun and waved a knife during a dispute on the street hockey court at Garvey Park in Neponset. Police were called to the city-owned Neponset Avenue park around 10:30 p.m. on Sunday night. According to a police report, two victims at the park reported that an assailant in a hooded sweatshirt had pulled the gun on a group of young people before fleeing the park.  Read more

Volunteers help seniors network, eat well at Carney

Caritas Carney Hospital hosted a bi-monthly senior supper last week at the hospital's cafeteria, and it was a near full-house for the event. Some 116 meals were served to neighborhood men and women, who each paid just $4 for the meal. The program also gave information about cancer prevention in a presentation by staff Oncologist Dr. Therese M. Mulvey, MD.  Read more