Business

Spire property in Savin Hill is listed for sale

By 
Lauren Dezenski, Reporter Staff
Oct. 31, 2014

The Spire company is presently headquartered at 65 Bay Street in Savin Hill. The property is listed for sale this week on a commercial real estate website.

Yet another development could be on the horizon in Savin Hill.

The Spire building at 65 Bay Street, adjacent to Savin Hill MBTA station, is on the market for $13.9 million.

The parcel was listed online this week as an “ideal redevelopment site,” according to the listing on commercial real estate website Loopnet.com.  Read more

City is weighing four plans for use of key Mattapan site

An image from the city of Boston request for proposals shows the Cote Ford property in Mattapan as seen from Cummins Highway. Image courtesy City of Boston

Four proposals have been submitted to the city of Boston by development teams eager to build a mix of housing and retail on the site of a long-empty Mattapan car dealership.

The Cote Ford property on Cummins Highway is situated close to a planned new station on the Fairmount commuter rail line, prompting renewed interest in what has been a forlorn corner of the neighborhood for decades.  Read more

Nov. 5 meeting set for Neponset Ave. condo, eatery proposal

A rendering from a document submitted to the BRA shows a proposed condo and restaurant project that would be sited at 367 Neponset Ave. Image courtesy Souza Design Architects

The Boston Redevelopment Authority will host a public meeting next Wednesday to review a developer’s proposal to convert a former Neponset Avenue store and warehouse into a four-story condominium complex with a restaurant. The meeting will be held on Wed., Nov. 5 at the Leahy-Holloran Community Center at 1 Worrell St., starting at 6:30 p.m.

In a letter to the BRA filed on October 15, the principal of Sousa Design, an architectural firm, explained that Paul Adamson, who owns and operates restaurants in South Boston and Quincy, will “lead a team” in the re-development of 367 Neponset Ave. The building once housed Boston Party Rental.  Read more

Vote Yes on Question 3: Stop the Casino ‘Mess’

The advertisements for casinos are so glamorous. Sexy young people gathered around a roulette wheel dressed in ravishing clothing and oozing wealth. And the picture painted by the casino industry that wants to be in our commonwealth is of a gambling glitterati, flying in from Paris and Dubai, spending their cash to support our state’s revenue needs, rather than spending it in Connecticut and providing lots of jobs in the process. No pain, lots of gain.  Read more

Globe’s on the move: Why not stay in Dot?

Boston Globe's property: Based in Dorchester since 1958.Boston Globe's property: Based in Dorchester since 1958.

Some day soon, the Boston Globe property on Morrissey Boulevard will be sold and its hulking, three-story Pulitzer Prize-making plant will be pulverized. That’s a given and we’re good with it.

What we don’t know – yet – is the identity of the new steward of the 16-acre preserve on the banks of Patten’s Cove. But whoever takes the deed will no doubt bring us condos and baked goods and free wi-fi. Maybe we’ll even get a nice chain restaurant, the first of its kind outside of South Bay.  Read more

All eyes on pending sale of Boston Globe property

The 16 acre Boston Globe site on Morrissey Boulevard is for sale. The Globe's new ownership under John Henry is staying mum on who the finalists are to buy the property. A city master plan for Columbia Point has identified the Globe as a prime parcel for mixed-use redevelopment— a plan endorsed by Mayor Marty Walsh. Photo courtesy Colliers International

Future of Morrissey Blvd. site is very much on Mayor Walsh’s mind

Mayor Martin Walsh hopes that the sale of the massive Boston Globe property on Morrissey Boulevard will result in a new mixed-use development that will follow guidelines laid out by a city-led task force four years ago.  Read more

Historic Boston Inc. ready to save landmark Mattapan farm

The Fowler-Clark farm has been boarded up in recent years to prevent further damage from squatters. The farmhouse dates to the 18th century. Reporter file photo

A historic but endangered Mattapan landmark could soon have a new owner that would ensure that it remains viable for decades to come. Historic Boston Inc. has entered into an agreement to purchase the Fowler-Clark farmhouse on Norfolk Street. The transaction will not be executed until next March, giving the non-profit preservation group time to raise funds and create a definitive plan for re-using the property’s old structures for housing.

The farmhouse, which was built at the turn of the 18th century, is one of the city’s last tangible links to a now-distant agrarian past. Designated as historic landmarks in 2006, the house and an adjacent barn have since been boarded up by city inspectors worried that squatters would destroy the buildings through vandalism or fire.  Read more

Former Neponset funeral home director charged with flurry of crimes

By 
Staff
Oct. 8, 2014

Joseph V. O'Donnell. Photo courtesy Suffolk County DA's Office

A former Neponset funeral home director has been named in a "sweeping, 278-count indictment" charging him with illegally storing dead bodies for years in a storage facility while bilking customers out of tens of thousands of dollars in pre-payments for burials that never happened. Joseph V. O'Donnell, 56, is also alleged to have operated his family-owned funeral home without a license in over 200 funerals and cremations.  Read more

Walsh administration sets stage for housing growth in new report

City Housing Report 2014-2030: A graphic from the city report characterizes "access to the Homeownership Market" by neighborhood. Image courtesy City of BostonCity Housing Report 2014-2030: A graphic from the city report characterizes "access to the Homeownership Market" by neighborhood. Image courtesy City of BostonThe Walsh administration released its first housing plan this week. The 140-page document is titled “Housing a Changing City: Boston 2030” and lays out the major challenges and goals for meeting the demand for new housing for a population that is on the rise. The plan anticipates that the city’s population will surge past the 709,000 mark by 2030 — a growth from today of some 91,000 people.

The report notes that the last time Boston was home to 700,000-plus people was in the 1950s. Back then, large families often lived in a single unit — like the classic Dorchester three-decker experience. In today’s Boston, this report notes, “fewer people inhabit each unit of housing, making our current housing stock insufficient to accommodate this growth.”

Insufficient is putting it mildly. Even in Dorchester, which is categorized in this report as one of the city neighborhoods with “good access” to middle income housing, it is becoming increasingly difficult for people to find affordable homes or rental units.

The report is candid in saying that “given the constraints of space, the high cost of land, declining federal funding, and a finite amount of City dollars available, we must acknowledge that the City cannot build its way out of this problem.” But, build we must. The Walsh plan pledges to produce 53,000 new units of housing between now and 2030 – a growth of 20 percent in terms of the number of households.  Read more

Parking stand-off leaves Savin Hill condo plan in limbo

Savin Hill Ave. project: Architect’s rendering showed proposed condos over Savin Bar + Kitchen. Drawing courtesy RODE Architects.Savin Hill Ave. project: Architect’s rendering showed proposed condos over Savin Bar + Kitchen. Drawing courtesy RODE Architects.

The future of a vacant lot across from Savin Hill T station, previously the site of a proposed 14-unit residential and commercial development, hangs in the balance after the project’s private developer, David Higgins, said late Tuesday evening that he was walking away from the development.  Read more