City Council

Ross suspends Feeney's fact-finder, sets course for 2009

New City Council President Michael Ross, citing the economy and a gag-order motion filed by prosecuting attorneys in Councillor Chuck Turner's bribery case, halted an council investigation into Turner's fitness to serve on Tuesday.

Federal investigators moved to limit to public documents what the $500-an-hour fact finder, former Chief Magistrate Charles B. Swartwood III, could access.

But a rule change also enacted by Ross would enable the council to penalize and even eject Turner from the body by a two-thirds majority vote.  Read more

Walsh steps out for Arroyo: Speaks in support of council run

Felix G. Arroyo and Marty Walsh: Photo courtesy of Felix G. Arroyo.Felix G. Arroyo and Marty Walsh: Photo courtesy of Felix G. Arroyo.  Read more

Prosecutors ask for pre-trial gag order on Turner

Federal prosecutors are telling District 7 Councillor Chuck Turner, whom they've charged with corruption, to pipe down, citing the intense media coverage of the case. Turner has pledged to fight the gag order.

In a motion filed on Monday in U.S. District Court, U.S. Assistant Attorney John McNeil asked for the gag order to be imposed on Turner, preventing him from talking about the case and any materials the government may have to give him over the course of the case.  Read more

More council hopefuls emerge out of Dorchester

Amidst news of Councillor Sam Yoon's growing bank account - at $158,158 as of Tuesday - at least one new potential candidate is rubbing his chin in contemplation - and the guy's OFD. And over in District 4, Councillor Charles Yancey also picked up a challenger.

"I'm keeping my options open," said Dorchester's Doug Hurley. "A run for at-Large is something I'm considering, but some things would have to happen."

Hurley hinted that it may have something to do with how many at-Large seats are left open by mayoral candidates, and who decides to run for them.  Read more

Ross ascendancy gives Connolly a new platform with 'Livable Boston' panel

Councillor Michael Ross's election to the Council president's chair on Monday signals yet another yearly council ritual - the backroom battles over committee assignments.

The early winner of this traditionally underground skirmish seems to be at-Large Councillor John Connolly, whose special "Livable Boston" committee was among Ross's first announcements. Connolly's committee theme recalls ideas he drove home at backyard barbeques and house parties all over the city during his 2007 campaign.  Read more

Kenneally is raising funds, mulling run for at-Large seat; Rest of the council-hopeful field is still shaping up

Andrew Kenneally: "Decision next month."Andrew Kenneally: "Decision next month."Andrew Kenneally, a former staffer for City Councillor Michael Flaherty, said he hasn't decided whether he will run for the Council at-Large seat his old boss is likely to vacate just yet, but he's fundraising anyway.

"I'm probably going to make a decision next month," he said. "I'm just trying to see what's out there in terms of raising cash and it's looking pretty good."

Kenneally has deposited $4,400 in his account, according to the Office of Campaign and Political Finance, but said he is likely to reach $10,000 by the time this paper is printed.

Jamaica Plain's Felix G. Arroyo is the leading fundraiser among the challengers so far, with over $13,000. His first fundraising event - for Three Kings Day - is Jan. 10 at Mojitos nightclub downtown.  Read more

Feeney reign a model of 'unity' politics

Maureen FeeneyMaureen Feeney  Read more

Backers say Ross has votes for council presidency

City Councillor Michael Ross will succeed Dorchester's Maureen Feeney as the president of the Boston City Council next year through a unique agreement that will make his chief opponent for the job, Councillor Steve Murphy, the body's vice-president. The arrangement was disclosed on Wednesday, hours after the Reporter's website broke the news that Ross had lined up the seven votes he needs to win the presidency.  Read more

Galvin still opposes 'Sticky Rice' ballot translations

A proposal before the Boston City Council to provide bilingual ballots and translate candidates' names into Chinese characters appears poised to reignite debate over the practice as the state's chief elections officer says he remains opposed to the translating.

As part of a 2006 law stemming from an agreement with the U.S. Justice Department, Boston provides bilingual ballots for Chinese and Vietnamese-speaking voters.

But the agreement expires in December 2008, which has prompted Sam Yoon, councillor at-large, to file a bill making the agreement permanent.  Read more

Council considers eliminating preliminary at-large election

The City Council was scheduled to consider a home rule petition on Wednesday that would eliminate a preliminary at-large City Council election scheduled for this September and allow all nine candidates who have filed the requisite signatures to compete for four seats in the final election in November.  Read more