Dorchester Ave.

Projects could get fast-tracked

The patiently waiting Peabody Square and Dorchester Avenue improvement projects could be bumped to the front of the line with the help of President Obama's proposed nearly $1 trillion economic recovery package.

Mayor Tom Menino announced the formation of a city Economic Recovery Team last week, created to lobby for and distribute federal dollars once the bill is signed. Currently under debate in Congress, the stimulus package is expected to reach the president by mid-February.  Read more

Caritas Christi signs labor accord with 1199 SEIU

Caritas Christi Health Care, the corporate parent of Caritas Carney Hospital on Dorchester Avenue, has signed an accord with two unions to allow "free and fair" voting conditions for the system's nearly 7,000 employees as they decide whether to form unions or not.

Nurses at the Carney are already organized through the Massachusetts Nurses Association, but most workers there are not represented.  Read more

New songs from old church on Dot Ave.

It was a Saturday, not a Sunday, when the former St. William's church had people back in its pews and songs that could be heard out on Dorchester Avenue.

Over 300 people, worshippers from Dorchester, Roxbury, Rhode Island, New York and Cape Verde, came for the first service in the ex-Catholic church, now in the care of Seventh-Day Adventists from Roxbury.

"We are here because God is good," said Pastor Samuel Bulgin, welcoming his congregation to the first service at the church. A chorus of "Amen" followed.  Read more

Taps at blue-collar Dot Ave. tavern

To be sure, the old-school pubs and taverns still holding on around Dorchester are not universally loved. But each of them, no matter how much the Larry Bird and Bobby Orr posters have faded on the walls, is intensely loved by a crowd of regulars of variable size, and that is definitely the case of the Peabody Tavern on Dorchester Ave.  Read more

Dorchester Ave. a dividing line in skinhead flick

Kevin Hearns has a successful career on Wall Street, a beautiful wife in New York City, and a haunting past back at home in Dorchester, where he ran the streets as a violent, racist neo-Nazi kid. When an ailing family member brings him back to Boston, he is forced to face his demons and accept responsibility for young lives lost to the senseless violence and unfounded hatred that characterized his younger days as a skinhead.  Read more

Dorchester's Main Street, 2008: For avenue steeped in transition, more changes to come

On Dorchester Avenue, there are signs of change and of changes to come.

Near St. Mark's Church, at the Dot2Dot Café, a family sits down for an early breakfast with a laptop on the table, while the air ripens with the smell of a bacon and mushroom quiche in the oven.

In Fields Corner, at Dippin' Donuts, a racially mixed clientele coils around the counter, while a new mixed-use development takes shape across the street.  Read more

Dot Ave's newest address offers big views, convenience

The Carruth houses a mix of retail and residential units. Photo by Chris Lovett  Read more

Once a toll road, Dorchester Ave. is a route that is rich in history

By 
Rev. Daniel Dunn
May. 28, 2008

As our Dorchester Day Parade Marshal assembles the official cars "across the bridge," they will be in Milton, which was part of the Town of Dorchester, until it became a separate town in 1662. Proceeding to the official starting point, the cars will cross the Neponset River at the spot where the Federal Triumphal Arch was erected in 1798, to commemorate the ratification of Jay's Treaty.  Read more

Menino touts Dot Ave. reconstruction

In a speech on Tuesday to the Dorchester Board of Trade, Mayor Thomas Menino previewed the budget he plans to submit to the City Council in April, vowing that police staffing levels will be maintained and school funding will be increased, even as the city's schools struggle with a wide deficit and, in some cases, under-enrollment. School closings would not be considered until late next year, he added.  Read more

Racial tensions improved, but not resolved

It was a bright, sunny June Sunday, six or seven years ago, and our community's annual parade was marching down Dot Ave. to the delight of the many neighbors who had come out to enjoy the extravaganza.

I was standing near the entrance to Dot Park, and the spirit was festive among the many folks there. Most were unknown to me, including a pair of thirty-something guys who were enjoying a beverage or two while making sly asides at the passing throng.

They cheered the pols, saluted the veterans' post color guards, and cheered the youth hockey kids as they proudly passed by.  Read more