Politics

Education in spotlight again at Menino's State of City speech

The Mayor Menino show rolled into Uphams Corner's Strand Theatre for the second year in a row on Tuesday, bringing squadrons of traffic cops, shuttle buses and a quintet of royal-sounding horns. On the program was a new plan to scale back the city's school bus routes, a plan to re-create the "Boston Miracle" of the 1990s and an emphasis on "green" initiatives.

Hours before the crowds arrived, took their seats and listened to Mayor Thomas Menino give his annual State of the City address, an angry fireman held a press conference of his own on the Columbia Road sidewalk outside.  Read more

Columbia Point Master Plan Task Force chosen

Mayor Thomas Menino has appointed fifteen individuals, including residents of Columbia Point and adjacent neighborhoods, business people and one transportation advocate, to a Columbia Point Master Plan Task Force. The Boston Redevelopment Authority originally intended to choose the task force by last fall, but took longer than expected.

"There was no specific delay, it was just when we were able to get it down to the mayor and have him look at it," said BRA spokesperson Jessica Shumaker.  Read more

Over mayor's wishes, Feeney plans civic summit

By 
Martine Louis
Jan. 9, 2008

It was a historic moment for Maureen Feeney as a unanimous noontime vote among city council colleagues on Monday, Jan. 7 made her the longest-serving woman council president in Boston's history. Re-elected for her second term as president, Feeney says the experience was one of her proudest.  Read more

Dot woman vows to fight city on residency reform

The fight to keep Boston employees within city limits may resurface this year and could become a campaign issue if a Dorchester activist has her way.

Eileen Boyle, an activist with "Save Our City," a pro-residency group, and a member of a residency compliance commission, is seeking signatures for a petition that charges both the mayor and the city council do not have the authority to change the rules requiring municipal employees to live within the city.  Read more

Feeney 'unconvinced' on moving Carney away from acute care, critical of shift to 'beahvioral health' facility

Boston City Council President Maureen E. Feeney issued the following statement today on the Attorney General's report on Caritas Christi Health Care System and Caritas Carney Hospital.

"This report clearly echoes what we know about the Caritas Christi Health Care System: that it faces significant fiscal and operational challenges and in order to remain viable it must reform its governance to operate independent from the Archdiocese of Boston.  Read more

Arroyo out, Connolly in for at-large council; Anemic turnout across city

In a rare rebuke by a city electorate fond of its incumbent pols, voters on Tuesday replaced at-large city councillor Felix Arroyo of Jamaica Plain with West Roxbury's John Connolly, an attorney and former teacher who finished fourth overall. Incumbents Michael Flaherty, Steve Murphy and Sam Yoon - in that order - took the top three spots in citywide balloting. Yoon, who lives near Field's Corner, won the majority of Dorchester's precincts and made strong inroads citywide, replacing Arroyo as the leading minority vote-getter in Boston.  Read more

AG Coakley to review finances of Caritas group

Now that three different Catholic hospital chains have declined to take over Caritas Christi Health Care from the Archdiocese of Boston, Attorney General Martha Coakley has deemed it a good time to perform a review of the chain's ability to "stand alone."

"It is our hope and expectation that this review will help develop a road map with which our office, the Archdiocese, Caritas management, the health care community and the communities that Caritas serves may ensure that the health care mission is preserved and strengthened," said Coakley in a statement.  Read more

Long-shot candidate challenges Feeney for second time

Michael Coté's website touts a lone endorsement: The Massachusetts ACORN Political Action Committee.

"I think it is a long shot," Coté admits of his second run at the District 3 seat held by Boston City Council President Maureen Feeney. "Whether I win or lose depends on whether people are upset" about the issues in play, including property taxes and the number of cops on the street.  Read more

Kennedy, congressmen push for energy reforms at Dot House

By 
David Benoit
Oct. 24, 2007

Kayla Leonard, only one day after her second birthday, reached her hand across to touch little John Jordan, three months old. Completely unaware of the situation that surrounded them, the two smiled at each other as they sat on their mothers' laps at the Dorchester House on Monday.

Ten feet away sat an influential panel of men in shirts and ties, two congressmen and two former congressmen. They were there to talk about the fate of children like Kayla and John, who may not have the heat needed to keep them healthy this upcoming winter.  Read more

Council hopeful makes pitch, one party at a time; Connolly banking on turnout push

"It's quiet out here," is the standard Dot-onian comment on the at-large City Council race this cycle. With expectations of a low-turnout, little to no press coverage and only five candidates with operations proven to pull significant votes citywide, incumbents seem to be dusting off the old campaign gear only now, three weeks before the final election.

On the other hand, skilled political observers willing to bet a trifecta in the race are exceedingly rare.  Read more